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Why It Is Important to Remain Anonymous.

Topic closed. 38 replies. Last post 10 years ago by lucky146.

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rundown99's avatar - cigar

United States
Member #567
August 14, 2002
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Posted: June 23, 2006, 12:39 pm - IP Logged

This is undoubtedly one of the most important posts that you will ever see at Lottery Post, and as someone who has posted on here for years, I honestly suggest that you read this very carefully! 

 

For months, I thought about what I would do if I won the lottery, and what my life would be like.  I thought about where I would want to buy my tickets.  Sometimes, I would think about being anonymous.  Sometimes, I would think about whether to hold a news conference if I couldn't be anonymous in a certain state. 

I wanted to point out that whether you play your numbers or play quick pick, the most important thing regarding the lottery is what you do AFTER you win.  That is the REAL test.

I know that all of you are wondering why I would keep preaching that you should be anonymous if you win.  You are probably tired of hearing me talk about this topic.  But I feel that it is in the best interest of the lottery winner to become anonymous.  There are several reasons why I think that it is important to play the lottery in a state where you can be anonymous:

 

#1.  You are GUARANTEED to get the money!!!!

    If you claim the lottery prize and your name becomes public, anyone (whether the person is a family member, relative, friend, ex-girlfriend, ex-boyfriend, or stranger) could file a lawsuit, claiming that he/she is entitled to a share of the money.  Last night's episode of Windfall has become a reality for actual lottery winners.  If you saw the episode, a woman named "Sonny" who was out of town on the night of the drawing was able to file a lawsuit against 20 people who won the jackpot.  I don't want to spoil the show for you if you haven't watched it, so I will leave it at that.  There is a lawsuit filed by a Southern California man against a group of Mega Millions winners for a $315 lottery jackpot prize.  The lawsuit is going to trial and the money is frozen until the trial is resolved.   There have been times in the past when lawsuits would cost so much time that people have died before the case was resolved.  Imagine the legal fees and time spent all because someone decided to play a "game".

 

#2.  There is NO possibility of family feuds.

      If you win and your name goes public, the first people who will have a hand out are the people who know you personally.  Even if you change your phone number, people will still email you and relatives you haven't seen in years will come out of the woodwork looking for you. 

I read about what happened to William "Bud" Post III, a former carnival worker and cook who did several odd jobs and won $16 million in the Pennsylvania Super 7 lottery in 1988.  His ex-girlfriend successfully sued him for a third of the winnings and one of his siblings allegedly hired a hitman to kill him.  Relatives asked Bud Post to loan them money, and his siblings pestered him to set up business ventures which later failed.  The failures of those businesses strained the relationships between Post and his siblings. 

Parents will want you to spend lavishly on them and their "friends".  If you have siblings, don't tell me that they won't constantly want a monetary gift.  Don't get me wrong.  I know that everyone has a moral obligation to help his/her family.  But as Robert Sanford says in his book "Infinite Financial Freedom" in the chapter, Don't Give into Family Pressures, there is a right way and a wrong way to help people, and you must follow your plan, NOT theirs.  But there is NO way that family members can fight you over YOUR money if they don't know that you won to begin with. 

 

#3.  You won't have to worry about the possibility of jealous friends. 

Friends will ask you for money and treat you like a human checking account.  If you turn them down, they will loathe you and resent you.  Some friends will be jealous of you.   Robert Sanford points out in his book, "Infinite Financial Freedom", that some friends will expect you to pay for entire outings when you are with them.    He also says in the chapter "Expect to Lose Some Friends"  that "Human nature is what it is and you, in turn, will lose some friends.  Sorry."  If you are anonymous, you can keep your money AND your friends, because no one except you and the lawyer will know that you won to begin with, as long as you keep your mouth shut.

 

#4.  You won't have to worry about those annoying lawsuits

      Bud Post was sued from an ex-girlfriend for a third of his jackpot prize.  And they weren't even married.  Jack Whittaker gets sued from an employee at a race track and from a bar manager.  A parking attending in New York wins a Mega Millions jackpot, and his wife IMMEDIATELY divorces him and sues him for half of the money.  If you win the lottery and your name gets public, you better be DAMN careful about who you marry, and you better get a pre-nuptual agreement.  Because if you are not careful, that golddigger of a new spouse will want half of your money!  However, if you are anonymous, such problems are not even an issue.

 

#5.  You will have ABSOLUTE privacy.

  Many lottery winners whose identities become public feel the pressure from the news media who repeatedly ask for interviews, strangers asking for money, and relatives coming out of the woodwork.   Imagine what your life would be like if you were at a movie theater and people walked up to you asking for money.  You might as well stay at home 24/7 in a GATED community.  Many people who win the lottery would NOT even want to go through that initial aftermath again.  But if you remain anonymous (in certain states such as North Dakota, Delaware, Kansas, and a few other states with the help of an attorney and trusts), you can actually live a NORMAL life.

 

********* AND THE MOST IMPORTANT REASON ********* 

#6.  The safety of you and those around you.

A while back, I read an online article from the USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-11-27-lottery-win_x.htm).  The article points out the problems that happened to lottery winners after their windfall.   Some lottery winners have died and even people who didn't win have lost their lives as a result of being around a lottery winner's family.  Imagine if you or your loved one was kidnapped for ransom.  The lottery winner from West Virginia lost his granddaughter and someone died in his home.  A woman from Minnesota whose husband won the Powerball in 2001 was responsible for a drunk-driving accident which killed one person and paralyzed another.  But if you are anonymous, you can be assured that you and your family will be safe. 

 

I know that many people are probably tired of hearing me point out the importance of anonymity, and I apologize for the extremely long post.  But this website is the most important lottery message forum on the Internet.  And I believe that we have the most determined lottery players in the world looking through the web pages of this site.  Todd has brought to us a great forum for research and communicating with lottery players around the world. 

I would like to thank Todd for a great web site, and I would like to thank all the people who come here to post their thoughts on the message forum.  I would love to hear your thoughts regarding lottery stories and responses to my post.  Remember, as Robert Sanford points out in his book, what is most important is WHAT YOU DO AFTER YOU WIN.  It would be a shame if someone from Lottery Post screwed up his/her life from a lottery windfall despite the invaluable information that can be found throughout these forums.  Thank you Todd for a great website, and thanks to all of you here at Lottery Post for your time in reading my thoughts.

 

Good Luck to All of You

 

Sincerely Yours,

rundown99

Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!

    emilyg's avatar - cat anm.gif

    United States
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    Posted: June 23, 2006, 12:45 pm - IP Logged

    good advice.  never tell.

    love to nibble those micey feet.

     

                                 

      bellyache's avatar - 64x64a9wg

      United States
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      Posted: June 23, 2006, 12:53 pm - IP Logged

      I agree with your post rundown, but in some states it is impossible to remain completely anonymous. Especially if the jackpot is huge. There are ways to make yourself dull and not interesting during the interview, but your name is bound to come out if your state lottery does't allow anonymity.

      Dance like no one is watching.

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        Poway CA (San Diego County)
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        Posted: June 23, 2006, 12:55 pm - IP Logged

        It won't work in California.  Here is what the California Lottery has to say about that:

        As a state agency, the California Lottery is subject to public disclosure laws that allow access to certain governmental records. Your name, the name and location of the retailer who sold the winning ticket, the date you won, and the amount of your winnings, including your gross and net installment payments, are matters of public record and are subject to disclosure.

          LOTTOMIKE's avatar - cash money.jpg
          Tennessee
          United States
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          October 15, 2004
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          Posted: June 23, 2006, 12:58 pm - IP Logged

          i hope i end up with these issues,lol!

            lucky146's avatar - animal monkey.jpg
            ny
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            Posted: June 23, 2006, 2:28 pm - IP Logged

            Nice post rundown. I basically agree with it but I think it would be extremely challenging not to tell anyone. (close friends/family). Jackpot size is certainly a factor in how I would handle it though. I mean if you walk with $50 mil good luck keeping it under the covers.

              rundown99's avatar - cigar

              United States
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              Posted: June 23, 2006, 5:46 pm - IP Logged

              Nice post rundown. I basically agree with it but I think it would be extremely challenging not to tell anyone. (close friends/family). Jackpot size is certainly a factor in how I would handle it though. I mean if you walk with $50 mil good luck keeping it under the covers.

              Good point Lucky146

              It would be hard to keep it a secret if the jackpot was extremely high.  It depends on how good the winner is in keeping secrets.

              Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

              If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!

                Kola's avatar - image
                Blundering Time Traveler

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                Posted: June 23, 2006, 7:04 pm - IP Logged

                Thanks for the thread rundown99.

                I have thought about this at length, and I would also keep it quiet from everyone. but my lady had a better idea. She says that if she won, she would tell her family, but she would quote a much lower figure. Maybe $90,000 or so. That would justify some of the life changes people would see you go through and satisfies any questions about the money won. Poeple would tend to leave you alone and not bother you with just a lowly $90,000.

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                  New Mexico
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                  Posted: June 23, 2006, 7:25 pm - IP Logged

                  Rundown:

                  Seems to me it's good advice you're offering, whether the jackpot is large or small.  There are dozens of side-issues involved on a jackpot (or significant tier-win) going outside the boundaries a person would normally think of.

                  Letting people know your business, particularly financially, but on just about anything at all, doesn't serve any useful purpose most of the time.  I've encountered it on such things as mining claims (which are supposed to protect the claim-holder) and found it serves as a magnet, instead.  Aside from all the regulatory people suddenly swarming you, everyone else you're supposed to be protecting yourself from by filing a claim is suddenly able to know everything about what you filed, examine it on the ground, run up-channel from you and test while you're busy dealing with all the paper-storm you created to protect yourself.

                  Notwithstanding what the laws require everywhere, I think a person who uses his time between winning and having to claim the prize to full advantage can find a means of circumventing having his name connected to the win.  I'd bet there are attorneys who'd gladly sign a side-contract binding them to only taking, say, a million of it, and claiming the entire prize for you without your name ever being mentioned. 

                  Maybe even a binding agreement in the form of a bill of sale for the ticket (contract written up and scrutinized by a different attorney) to him for most of the cash value of the jackpot minus, say, a million after taxes.

                  And I agree completely that it's worth whatever trouble and expense a person has to go to in order to get it done.

                  Jack

                  Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                  It's about number behavior.

                  Egos don't count.

                   

                  Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                   

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                    New Mexico
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                    Posted: June 23, 2006, 7:33 pm - IP Logged

                    Look if your scared about winning the lottery because you can't remain anonyous, then i think you should quit. If you do win in most states you can't remain unknown. Thats why if you do win, you don't claim the money right away, thats the worst thing that you can do, wait for like 2-3 weeks and in that time make some plans about what you're going to do.  I think this post is a joke.

                    I'm not scared of anything, to the best of my knowledge, Jackpot Player.  But what he's saying isn't a joke to a lot of people on LP.  And you thinking a person should quit if he's concerned about it is worth roughly the price of a bucket of spit.

                    If people choose to be concerned about such things it certainly isn't for someone who thinks differently to feel the need to concern himself about it.

                    Jack

                    Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                    It's about number behavior.

                    Egos don't count.

                     

                    Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                     

                      awwcrap's avatar - moon
                      ky
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                      Posted: June 23, 2006, 7:46 pm - IP Logged

                      Well taken advice  ty rundown---good postStooges

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                        New Mexico
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                        Posted: June 23, 2006, 7:47 pm - IP Logged

                        Rundown and anyone else interested in the issue:

                        As I understand things, a lottery ticket belongs to the person who signs it.  Which would mean it can be sold, unsigned, to anyone who'd care to buy it, payable after the ticket is claimed, for any price that can be agreed to by both parties.

                        I recall during the early days of HIV, a lot of people who contracted it had life insurance policies.  There were businesses who thrived buying beneficiary status those life insurance policies from the folks who were dying of HIV, giving them something up front and betting when they'd make a haul when they claimed the policy.

                        In a sense, this is the same sort of approach to getting a buyer for a winning lottery jackpot, paying whatever it costs to keep ones own name from being associated with it.

                        Jack

                        Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                        It's about number behavior.

                        Egos don't count.

                         

                        Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                         


                          United States
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                          June 22, 2005
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                          Posted: June 23, 2006, 8:03 pm - IP Logged

                          It's just the law of A reaction to every action.

                          Time relies on movement of objects. If nothing moves, there is no such thing as time. It's all one.....The Now.....

                          Just like GOD!!!!!

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                            BILOXI, MISSISSIPPI
                            United States
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                            Posted: June 23, 2006, 9:06 pm - IP Logged
                            Louisiana lets you hide    I just hope I could keep my mouth shut    But the best thing one could do is hide    I know people change on you ,when money is in play  
                             
                             
                              spy153's avatar - maren

                              United States
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                              December 15, 2005
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                              Posted: June 23, 2006, 9:29 pm - IP Logged

                              can you remain anonymous in tn?

                              voir-vous dans mes reves!Cool