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Is statistics method really useful to predict drawing number?

Topic closed. 32 replies. Last post 9 years ago by RJOh.

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Harbinger
D.C./MD.
United States
Member #44103
July 30, 2006
5583 Posts
Online
Posted: February 26, 2008, 9:54 am - IP Logged

I know someone who hit DC Daily 6 6 for 6 using birthdays.  CT, RJ the birthday thing doesn't have to be limited to less than 31, some people use years, like 1935 (35) 1942 (42).

    RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
    mid-Ohio
    United States
    Member #9
    March 24, 2001
    19831 Posts
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    Posted: February 26, 2008, 10:23 am - IP Logged

    I know someone who hit DC Daily 6 6 for 6 using birthdays.  CT, RJ the birthday thing doesn't have to be limited to less than 31, some people use years, like 1935 (35) 1942 (42).

    I know.  Since I was born in the forties, when I play my birthday and that of my bother, I use the month, date and year.  Any one born before 1957 can probably do the same thing in a lottery somewhere.  It unlikely people playing their grand kids birthdays can do the same.

    Ohio's Lot'O Play (6/100) used 0-99, but nobody played it so they replaced it with Classic Lotto (6/49).

     * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
       
                 Evil Looking       

      RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
      mid-Ohio
      United States
      Member #9
      March 24, 2001
      19831 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: February 26, 2008, 11:08 am - IP Logged

      I've running a service for almost 5 years to predict lotteries using statistics.   I can not share the site or link as per the Lottery Post user agreement.   We correctly predicted 5 of 5 in  the  Rolling Cash 12 times in 2007 and 3 times so far in 2008.  To prove my point we are currently running an experiment in the Ohio Rolling Cash Lottery.   You can see the top numbers we are predicting under my Lottery Post user name BillSam2008.   The fifth line was a mistaken entry on my part and will not be part of my daily post going forward.   On Saturday evening, we had a zero occurrence and it signalled the beginning of our experiment.   Read below for more about what we do.

      To explain why we have such a high success rate, let’s go back in history for a moment. Do you recall the group from MIT that went to casinos around the country playing black jack back in the 70’s? They would watch the cards played and depending on the value of the card, either increase or decrease a number in their head by the relative value. In one card counting system, cards 2 through 6 are assigned a value of +1. Tens (and face cards) through aces are assigned a value of -1. Cards 7, 8, and 9 have a value of zero (so they can be ignored). Once the player reached a predetermined level, they knew the remaining cards left to play were skewed towards high cards. This group understood that the odds were in their favor when the number of high cards remaining in the dealers deck was significantly higher than lower valued cards. They chose these times to play more vigorously and won enormous amounts of money until the casinos discovered what they were doing. These card counters were using math, and an understanding of statistics and probability to know when to play. This is what we do for you as a lottery player.

      We analyze the numbers drawn after each and every draw and rank the results. When our rankings are skewed to such a degree that we predict zero out five correctly, this is actually a good thing. We then know that we have in fact distilled the best, most probable numbers all together and the fun begins. What we have found, based on thousands upon thousands of simulations of our computer models, is that we predict a jackpot within 1 to 45 draws of a zero occurrence, 80-90% of the time. If you think of a zero prediction as the bottom of a wave and five of five as the top of a wave, just as in nature, the top of a wave ALWAYS follows the bottom.   This is not unlike work done by R.N. Elliot and the Elliot Wave which predicted the stock market.   Predicting the stock market is a lot tougher than predicing lotteries.

      I hope your service does better than your predictions.  You picked 5 lines for Ohio Rolling Cash5 02/25/08 and didn't even get a match2.  Keep predicting and good luck.

       * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
         
                   Evil Looking