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Went public too soon?

Topic closed. 64 replies. Last post 9 years ago by Stack47.

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Do you think the $270 mega millions winner went public too soon?

yes [ 59 ]  [59.00%]
no [ 10 ]  [10.00%]
maybe [ 4 ]  [4.00%]
who cares [ 24 ]  [24.00%]
no comment [ 3 ]  [3.00%]
Total Valid Votes [ 100 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 3 ]  
four4me's avatar - gate1
MD
United States
Member #1701
June 18, 2003
8360 Posts
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Posted: March 9, 2008, 11:58 am - IP Logged

Oh by golly!!!!   That sure looks like my long lost brother!!! By golly!! Yeah...it sure looks like him!

How do I get in touch with him......so that I can profess my long feelings for him (and his cash)...I really missed him all these years.  If only I can reach him....I miss him soooo much (and his money).

I'll be packing my bags and take my two dogs with me so that we be reunited as soon as possible!

Oh! Lost brother of mine...Where art thou!  Would you even remember me. LOL!

                                                                                                                                       Evil Smile

I've been here all along.... you must have noticed ........however all the cash is spent. I am now living in a brightly painted box outside the van parked down by the river. Because i was tossed out of the van by some wealthier bums. Am writing this post from the library.

Big John says. You don't hit the number. The number hits you!!!!

               I'm not Big John, I'm Four4me, Big John's a friend.
    LottoAce's avatar - WWI Flying_Ace.gif
    N.C.
    United States
    Member #56005
    October 28, 2007
    830 Posts
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    Posted: March 9, 2008, 12:03 pm - IP Logged

    I personally think that going public at anytime can be disatorous. I think that when people do that they are opening up another entirely different can of worms. I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information...

    but hey, its there ticket, there win, and there decision.

    "know your limitations, but excede your expectations"

      justxploring's avatar - villiarna
      Wandering Aimlessly
      United States
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      November 5, 2005
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      Posted: March 9, 2008, 4:55 pm - IP Logged

      I personally think that going public at anytime can be disatorous. I think that when people do that they are opening up another entirely different can of worms. I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information...

      but hey, its there ticket, there win, and there decision.

       "would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information..."

      Sure, and the folks at the GA lottery would just tell you "Okay, whatever you want.  We'll forget the official rules. Here's your money."   

      "its there ticket, there win, and there decision."

      No, it's not their decision. Whether you want to remain anonymous or not has nothing to do with the rules that have already been established.  If someone doesn't like them, then nothing is forcing that person to buy a ticket.  There are a few states where you can remain anonymous, but a blind trust will not protect your identity in a state where the winners agree to hold a press conference before they buy a ticket.  In many states, no matter in what form you claim your prize, your name and city of residence will be available to the public.  Personally, I agree with you and would never want my name, age & city in the paper, but if I play in FL I can't keep them from furnishing that information to the press since it's public information.

      BTW, does anyone in NC understand this answer to a question on the web site?

      "The NCEL will consider a winner’s name, city/county, and the prize amount a matter of public record, unless the winner produces a valid protective order or Address Confidentiality Program authorization card."
      Is this something you get from the Lottery Post Witness Protection Program that Coin Toss started? Smiley

        United States
        Member #59167
        March 8, 2008
        174 Posts
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        Posted: March 9, 2008, 5:16 pm - IP Logged

        I think they did. If you're going to go public, then do it at the time you claim your prize, not before when all you have is a slip of paper that anything could happen to it. 

        I am pretty sure that flashing that ticket in front of the camera guaranteed no one will take it away from him.  That was better then making a duplicate copy on some machine.  You steal that ticket and turn it in, and you are going to jail immediately. It is not like no one will know!

        I will turn my winning ticket in immediately. You don't get the cash for a month, so you income has gone up by zero. I have already picked out the Estate Lawyer Group that I want to handle the money, so I don't need to search for one. I just need to take the photograph to the team and say, start planning.  You have less then a month to create the trusts, LLC's, Inc's, and the rest to protect me.

        In the mean time, get a loan, based on the photograph, and start enjoying the power that one hundred million bring you.  Any one who doesn't believe one hundred million equals power should be buy candy bars instead of lottery tickets! You go into any hotel in LV and your picture will be right up there with the rest of VIPs in the securit room.  That picture would be the key to MGM Grand Luxury Suite!

        Hummer? Don't want no stinking Hummer. Want a Mercedes 625 AG.  The female chauffer would love to drive that baby!

          Guru101's avatar - rw6jhh
          Indiana
          United States
          Member #48725
          January 7, 2007
          1953 Posts
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          Posted: March 9, 2008, 5:30 pm - IP Logged

          I am pretty sure that flashing that ticket in front of the camera guaranteed no one will take it away from him.  That was better then making a duplicate copy on some machine.  You steal that ticket and turn it in, and you are going to jail immediately. It is not like no one will know!

          I will turn my winning ticket in immediately. You don't get the cash for a month, so you income has gone up by zero. I have already picked out the Estate Lawyer Group that I want to handle the money, so I don't need to search for one. I just need to take the photograph to the team and say, start planning.  You have less then a month to create the trusts, LLC's, Inc's, and the rest to protect me.

          In the mean time, get a loan, based on the photograph, and start enjoying the power that one hundred million bring you.  Any one who doesn't believe one hundred million equals power should be buy candy bars instead of lottery tickets! You go into any hotel in LV and your picture will be right up there with the rest of VIPs in the securit room.  That picture would be the key to MGM Grand Luxury Suite!

          Hummer? Don't want no stinking Hummer. Want a Mercedes 625 AG.  The female chauffer would love to drive that baby!

          As much as it would be nice showing off a ticket would guarantee no one would take it from you, that's just not how it works. Regardless of the number of the people you show the ticket to, the ticket must STILL undergo the same security procedures as any other ticket. They don't have to take the ticket because they want the money, they might take because they don't want YOU to have the money. The lottery doesn't care if you have a million people saying you had the ticket, you better have it when you want to claim it.

          Gonna win.Big Smile

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            Baton Rouge, LA
            United States
            Member #4602
            May 7, 2004
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            Posted: March 9, 2008, 5:58 pm - IP Logged

            I wouldn't go public at all if I could avoid it but if I did, I wouldn't do it until I had made my plans for what I plan to do and already made my plans.  Since I'm in a lottery pool, whether or not we go public will be determined partially by the other members, not just me.

            When I buy Powerball tickets myself(when the jackpot goes over $100 million), if I were to win, I'd stay out of the public eye altogether if I could.  On top of that, I wouldn't quit my job right away, I'd wait several months until the excitement died down.  I wouldn't want to risk anyone figuring it out.  I probably wouldn't go on a spending spree or try to show off either, just live my life quietly, like I do now.

            Prisoner Six

            "I am not a number, I am a free man!"


              United States
              Member #59167
              March 8, 2008
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              Posted: March 9, 2008, 6:26 pm - IP Logged

              As much as it would be nice showing off a ticket would guarantee no one would take it from you, that's just not how it works. Regardless of the number of the people you show the ticket to, the ticket must STILL undergo the same security procedures as any other ticket. They don't have to take the ticket because they want the money, they might take because they don't want YOU to have the money. The lottery doesn't care if you have a million people saying you had the ticket, you better have it when you want to claim it.

              I am inclined to go with the slim and null concept. Some one finding a way to steal the guys ticket, after all the publicity and hoopalah, in a small down, JUST for the purpose of ensuring they did NOT get the money. Slim and Null! Security procedures - booh! There have been several documented cases where tickets have been lost and the peoeple still got their prizes.  This the the lottery, not Hanzel & Gretel.  They do this for a living.  It would be interesting to know, how many real-time, vengeful, criminals are lucking in the background, with no other goal then to steal a lottery ticket, just so they could destroy it. They must be awfully broke by now! Hungry for PB&J also!

                Avatar
                Kentucky
                United States
                Member #32652
                February 14, 2006
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                Posted: March 9, 2008, 6:40 pm - IP Logged

                I personally think that going public at anytime can be disatorous. I think that when people do that they are opening up another entirely different can of worms. I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information...

                but hey, its there ticket, there win, and there decision.

                "I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information..."

                Maybe they saw Forbes's list of 1065 Billionaires and figured if the richest people in the World can't remain anonymous, why bother. Had they read the consensus in most "how to play" lottery books, they would have never played 6 numbers under 23.  If they didn't follow that 'expert advice', why would they listen to the advice of from a bunch of players that tore up and threw away losing tickets?

                The Georgia Lottery had a Mega Millions jackpot winner last year; a truck driver that basically cashed his ticket the same way so it's not like they have no experience with helping Mega winners. Most states ask jackpot winners to be in a horse and pony show but that is after their security gave them a "what to expect" booklet based on past experiences of all jackpot winners.

                Seriously, should they seek out "I would have" advice or experienced advice from people that have actually won a jackpot and went through the process? 


                  United States
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                  Posted: March 9, 2008, 6:49 pm - IP Logged

                  "I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information..."

                  Maybe they saw Forbes's list of 1065 Billionaires and figured if the richest people in the World can't remain anonymous, why bother. Had they read the consensus in most "how to play" lottery books, they would have never played 6 numbers under 23.  If they didn't follow that 'expert advice', why would they listen to the advice of from a bunch of players that tore up and threw away losing tickets?

                  The Georgia Lottery had a Mega Millions jackpot winner last year; a truck driver that basically cashed his ticket the same way so it's not like they have no experience with helping Mega winners. Most states ask jackpot winners to be in a horse and pony show but that is after their security gave them a "what to expect" booklet based on past experiences of all jackpot winners.

                  Seriously, should they seek out "I would have" advice or experienced advice from people that have actually won a jackpot and went through the process? 

                  It is extremely difficult to get advise from the intelligent winners, only the real idiots stay in the news.  Joe Smoe, owner of three gas stations, previous lottery winner, went bankrupt, and lives in a mobile home. That is the headlines and they guy with the most information.  You seldom hear about Joe When, owner of six Chain Resturants, living happily with friends and relatives in Las Vegas.  Those with a brain, and the capability to use it, have a huge advantage in making it big, and living the life of their dreams.  You just never hear about them  Making the one or two publicity appearances when you first win means nothing.  What counts is what you do over the next 12 months. The old shooters defensive tactic: If you make yourself a target, you will be shot at!  Stay in the public eyes, and your mistakes become public.

                    ThatScaryChick's avatar - x1MqPuM
                    Idaho
                    United States
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                    November 21, 2007
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                    Posted: March 9, 2008, 7:09 pm - IP Logged

                    "I would have chosen to claim the funds under a trust and would have told the lottery officials that they are not to use my likeness (display any photo of me, or make any video and post it on the news, or internet, etc...) and they are not to release any of my information..."

                    Maybe they saw Forbes's list of 1065 Billionaires and figured if the richest people in the World can't remain anonymous, why bother. Had they read the consensus in most "how to play" lottery books, they would have never played 6 numbers under 23.  If they didn't follow that 'expert advice', why would they listen to the advice of from a bunch of players that tore up and threw away losing tickets?

                    The Georgia Lottery had a Mega Millions jackpot winner last year; a truck driver that basically cashed his ticket the same way so it's not like they have no experience with helping Mega winners. Most states ask jackpot winners to be in a horse and pony show but that is after their security gave them a "what to expect" booklet based on past experiences of all jackpot winners.

                    Seriously, should they seek out "I would have" advice or experienced advice from people that have actually won a jackpot and went through the process? 

                    True, but sometimes there is nothing wrong with "I would have" advice. That said, there is also nothing wrong with getting advice from people who have been there and done that, but getting tips from those who haven't won yet isn't necessarily bad.

                    "No one remembers the person who almost climbed the mountain, only the person who eventually gets to the top."


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                      Posted: March 9, 2008, 8:34 pm - IP Logged

                      True, but sometimes there is nothing wrong with "I would have" advice. That said, there is also nothing wrong with getting advice from people who have been there and done that, but getting tips from those who haven't won yet isn't necessarily bad.

                      Usually, excellent advise is that advise that agree with your thoughts.  I have met more geniuses who agree with me, I have never met a genius who disagrees with me.  Strange how that works.

                        justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                        Wandering Aimlessly
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                        Posted: March 11, 2008, 2:00 am - IP Logged

                        Usually, excellent advise is that advise that agree with your thoughts.  I have met more geniuses who agree with me, I have never met a genius who disagrees with me.  Strange how that works.

                        Why don't you just do what I do & talk to yourself?  I find that avoids most arguments.

                          Avatar
                          New Member
                          Fayetteville, Arkansas
                          United States
                          Member #58962
                          March 2, 2008
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                          Posted: March 11, 2008, 4:17 am - IP Logged

                          The female chauffer would love to drive that baby!

                          Oh, MFYL, you are a smart fellow.  What a great idea.

                          In fact, why not recruit all your household staff at Hooters?

                          The balls have no memory.

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                            Kentucky
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                            Posted: March 11, 2008, 5:45 pm - IP Logged

                            True, but sometimes there is nothing wrong with "I would have" advice. That said, there is also nothing wrong with getting advice from people who have been there and done that, but getting tips from those who haven't won yet isn't necessarily bad.

                            We all have ideas of what we would do if we win and I've read many really good ideas on things that I'd never thought about before.  However we have to actually win to get to point of making a choice where those good ideas would be meaningful.

                            On this thread we were asked for our opinion and some people are saying Robert and Tonya Harris were stupid for going public so early trying to pass off their opinion as the definitive opinion. We get similar opinions in other threads on topics like annuity or cash, continuing to work or quiting your job, and remaining anonymous. I don't give any credibility to somebody that has never won a jackpot and never had to make those choices saying anything the winner does is stupid.

                            People can agree without ever winning a jackpot that buying, using, and getting addicted to illegal drugs is stupid, but once that is established, saying they were stupid for blowing a lottery jackpot is just stating the obvious.

                            The Wal Mart example was hindsight but it doesn't mean there wouldn't be other options or circumstances along the way that would have prevented that outcome. I can say as fact it would have been a great investment, but I can't say as fact everybody that had that choice and didn't make it are stupid because Warren Buffit probably turned his $10,000 investment into a billion during that same time frame.   

                              rubberbandman's avatar - Spawn Classic.jpg
                              mn
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                              Posted: March 11, 2008, 5:52 pm - IP Logged

                              We all have ideas of what we would do if we win and I've read many really good ideas on things that I'd never thought about before.  However we have to actually win to get to point of making a choice where those good ideas would be meaningful.

                              On this thread we were asked for our opinion and some people are saying Robert and Tonya Harris were stupid for going public so early trying to pass off their opinion as the definitive opinion. We get similar opinions in other threads on topics like annuity or cash, continuing to work or quiting your job, and remaining anonymous. I don't give any credibility to somebody that has never won a jackpot and never had to make those choices saying anything the winner does is stupid.

                              People can agree without ever winning a jackpot that buying, using, and getting addicted to illegal drugs is stupid, but once that is established, saying they were stupid for blowing a lottery jackpot is just stating the obvious.

                              The Wal Mart example was hindsight but it doesn't mean there wouldn't be other options or circumstances along the way that would have prevented that outcome. I can say as fact it would have been a great investment, but I can't say as fact everybody that had that choice and didn't make it are stupid because Warren Buffit probably turned his $10,000 investment into a billion during that same time frame.   

                              So true