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Went public too soon?

Topic closed. 64 replies. Last post 9 years ago by Stack47.

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Do you think the $270 mega millions winner went public too soon?

yes [ 59 ]  [59.00%]
no [ 10 ]  [10.00%]
maybe [ 4 ]  [4.00%]
who cares [ 24 ]  [24.00%]
no comment [ 3 ]  [3.00%]
Total Valid Votes [ 100 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 3 ]  
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Kentucky
United States
Member #32652
February 14, 2006
7322 Posts
Offline
Posted: March 11, 2008, 6:18 pm - IP Logged

It is extremely difficult to get advise from the intelligent winners, only the real idiots stay in the news.  Joe Smoe, owner of three gas stations, previous lottery winner, went bankrupt, and lives in a mobile home. That is the headlines and they guy with the most information.  You seldom hear about Joe When, owner of six Chain Resturants, living happily with friends and relatives in Las Vegas.  Those with a brain, and the capability to use it, have a huge advantage in making it big, and living the life of their dreams.  You just never hear about them  Making the one or two publicity appearances when you first win means nothing.  What counts is what you do over the next 12 months. The old shooters defensive tactic: If you make yourself a target, you will be shot at!  Stay in the public eyes, and your mistakes become public.

"It is extremely difficult to get advise from the intelligent winners"

Robert Harris is making choices because he had the winning ticket. The perception of which winners made intelligent choices or which made stupid choices is being made by people on the outside looking in. Any state lottery can give good advise based on things that worked well for other jackpot winners, but even they don't know what is the best advice.

"If you make yourself a target, you will be shot at!"

All of us can be a potential target by buying a ticket. Can you honestly say because of that the people throwing away losing tickets are better off than Harris?

    sirbrad's avatar - Lottery-062.jpg
    PA
    United States
    Member #22983
    October 6, 2005
    2226 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: March 12, 2008, 5:51 am - IP Logged

    No, just get it over with and don't be stalked.

      Avatar
      Kentucky
      United States
      Member #32652
      February 14, 2006
      7322 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: March 12, 2008, 10:20 pm - IP Logged

      Last year we read about a Georgia truck driver that basically did the same thing and a week later nobody could remember his name.

        Bondi Junction
        Australia
        Member #57242
        December 24, 2007
        1102 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: March 12, 2008, 11:15 pm - IP Logged

        He shouldn't have went public at all, if he could have avoided it. Our jackpots are never that big, but at least our winners are not paraded like performing monkeys.

          Avatar
          Kentucky
          United States
          Member #32652
          February 14, 2006
          7322 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: March 13, 2008, 8:35 pm - IP Logged

          He shouldn't have went public at all, if he could have avoided it. Our jackpots are never that big, but at least our winners are not paraded like performing monkeys.

          Just a wild guess; Harris called the Georgia Lottery Commission saying he had the winning Mega Millions ticket seeking information about collecting the prize. The lottery people probably gave him a choice of answering news media questions now or wait until a news conference where he would receive the symbolic huge check.

          Another wild guess; many of the lotteries use these horse and pony shows as a way to make it fun for the winners and to divulge all the public information prescribed by law. Some winners want their 15 minutes of fame and say things that promote follow-up stories a month or a year later. Brad Duke and Bunky Bartlett are examples of that.

          From a player perception I don't think it's necessary for us to see the shows but there is a point about providing proof a real person actually won. There have been a number of discussions about the discrepancies in the amount of jackpot winners in certain Mega Millions and Powerball states. Now if all we ever read was "somebody matched all the winning numbers in (fill in the blank state), some if not many of the players will begin questioning the integrity of the games.