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Do you sign your tickets?

Topic closed. 59 replies. Last post 3 years ago by BigDMike.

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London
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March 24, 2013
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Posted: December 30, 2013, 11:53 am - IP Logged

Sometimes, I don't make a habit of it tho.

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2016 Total: -£24

Jan: -£22 Feb: £0 ~ Mar: £0 ~ April: £0 ~ May: £0 ~ June: £0 ~ July: £2

 

EuroMillions = £2 Line / Played: x11 [old price] 

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    Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
    Los Angeles, California
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    Posted: December 30, 2013, 12:22 pm - IP Logged

    But what if something happens to your ticket between purchasing it and the drawing and it turns out to be a winner. These are the many stories we read about and what i was trying to make a discussion about Thumbs Up

    Well, if the ticket is lost or discarded before the draw, the signature won't help you. Wink

    But if it is stolen or subsequently found and recovered by someone else, if you put in a competing claim then it will most likely go in your favor.

    The lottery itself does recommend that people sign all their tickets. But they do this because they know of so many cases where people did not know the value of their tickets and put their trust in a clerk, who scammed them out of their winnings and leading to a lengthy investigation and trial. So to avoid that, just sign all your tickets.

    Or you could say:

    If you are the type of person that doesn't know the value of your tickets and blindly trusts a clerk by handing the tickets over to them for verification, you should sign all your tickets beforehand.

    But if you are someone that always checks and knows the value of your tickets, you can sign the tickets only when a signature is required.

      Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
      Los Angeles, California
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      Posted: December 30, 2013, 12:28 pm - IP Logged

      Yes, it was brought up regarding a news article which prompted me to start this discussion because i thought it was worthy of discussion. My goodness Jon, i just can't figure out where you are going because clearly, the lottery is gonna do a verification process with every ticket presented.

      Did i say anywhere that a verification process does not take place? My point was protecting your ticket in light of such stories where there are lost or stolen tickets that turn out to be winners by signing them. Unless someone has done something fraudulent, then the signature stands as the rightful owner.

      Sorry, that's probably just me then. I just saw a couple of phrases that didn't sound right and caught my eye:

      ...the lottery doesn't concern itself with whose signature got on a ticket...

      ...if someone else gets ahold of it and signs it, it's game over sadly for the rightful owner.

      I'll just turn down my phrasing sensitivity meter a few notches. No worries. We are on the same page...I guess. Wink

        Candlelight777's avatar - nw saucyelf.jpg
        Indiana
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        Posted: December 30, 2013, 1:08 pm - IP Logged

        Sorry, that's probably just me then. I just saw a couple of phrases that didn't sound right and caught my eye:

        ...the lottery doesn't concern itself with whose signature got on a ticket...

        ...if someone else gets ahold of it and signs it, it's game over sadly for the rightful owner.

        I'll just turn down my phrasing sensitivity meter a few notches. No worries. We are on the same page...I guess. Wink

        I disagree, if someone finds it, they will turn it in with hopes of being rewarded for doing so. If they don't, the ticket is worthless to them anyway because it's signed...so why wouldn't they turn it in knowing more then likely the owner of the ticket, who just won the JP, would reward them nicely for doing so?
         
        Proving that a ticket was stolen would be very very hard and one would have to have some hard evidence to prove differently. He said she said would not override a signature on a ticket. Think about it Jon, it's the purchasers responsibility to sign their ticket as well as what happens to their ticket. The lottery sees this as the responsibility of the purchaser, and the lottery goes out of their way to make sure the purchasers understands this by including on the very FIRST LINE first and foremost before anything else by stating this on the ticket as follows.

        "This ticket is a bearer instrument. Sign ticket immediately after purchase to establish ownership." 

        I think that puts to rest what the lottery recommends as far as SIGNING your ticket and WHY. It didn't say once your ticket is a winner sign it, it stated to sign it IMMEDIATELY after PURCHASE to establish OWNERSHIP.

        To the rest of your comments, whether a person knows or not the value of their ticket is irrelevant to this conversation, but signing your ticket does indeed once again prove to protect players from dishonest clerks who prey on those knowing they don't know the value of their ticket.

         

          Candlelight777's avatar - nw saucyelf.jpg
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          Posted: December 30, 2013, 1:27 pm - IP Logged

          Just to say again, because you are on camera purchasing that ticket does not establish ownership, the lottery has already told you how to do that, because what if a person bought it as a gift, stocking stuffer or used someone else's money for example, to purchase them tickets while they were at the store.  At the end of the day, who does the lottery believe, or do they need to? it's who is in possession of that ticket and whose signature is on that ticket...and the lottery tells you right on the ticket to establish your ownership immediately upon purchase, yet now this person wants to establish ownership now that it's a winner?...hmm good luck finding ground to stand on with that argument.

          Sign your ticketsBlue Angel

            savagegoose's avatar - ProfilePho
            adelaide sa
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            Posted: December 30, 2013, 7:01 pm - IP Logged

            remmember the story on here bout the apes that tried to claim a  prize with a name  scratched off the back, well  scratched thru with a pen?  yeah  putting ya name on back will ake life difficult for any apes that  wanna try it./

            2014 = -1016; 2015= -1409; 2016 JAN = -106; FEB= -81; MAR= -131; APR= - 87: MAY= -91; JUN= -39; JUL=-134; AUG= -124; SEP = -123; OCT= -84  NOV=- 73 TOT= -3498

            keno historic = -2291 ; 2015= -603; 2016= JAN=-32, FEB= +12 , MAR= -86, APR = -77. MAY= -48, JUN= -29, JUL=-71; AUG = -52; SEPT= -43; OCT = +56 NOV = -33 TOT= -3297

              maringoman's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcTbRxpKQmOfcCoUqF2FyqIOAwDo7rg9G-lfJLAALPGWJWwiz19eRw
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              Posted: December 30, 2013, 7:13 pm - IP Logged

              Do you sign your tickets?

              I used to sign them when I was a new player. I stopped doing that <snip> a long long time ago. I never lose my losing tickets so I am pretty sure I wouldn't be so unfortunate as to lose my only winning ticket. I personally check my lottery tickets so the risk of a dishonest clerk taking my money is non existent

              This post has been automatically changed by the Lottery Post computer system to remove inappropriate content and/or spam.

              That money's gone fo ever

                rdgrnr's avatar - walt
                Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
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                Posted: December 30, 2013, 7:41 pm - IP Logged

                I always sign 'em cuz they're multi-draws good for the month and I don't want no varmint havin' that many chances to win on my dime.

                I don't know how much good it'd do cuz I can't make out my signature my ownself and I never sign it the same way twiced anyway.

                  ttech10's avatar - blobdude
                  Texas
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                  Posted: December 30, 2013, 10:54 pm - IP Logged

                  Actually, i believe that may be a myth in most cases and it makes sense why that may be when i think about the way the lottery explained it to me recently. I have been asking some questions and if i was you, i would thoroughly look into this for your particular state lottery. The way it was explained to me was once you present your ticket and the process of verifying is complete, a whole new process of legal claim forms are presented which addresses things like the handling of proceeds going forward. This is where things like setting up a trust will be legally documented and entered. Signing your ticket protects ownership of your ticket, but it's the legal claim forms that is the official legal agreement on how the funds will be handled. For me, this makes sense.

                  Fingerprints can indentify that someone held that ticket, but it doesn't verify that the fingerprint on the ticket is the rightful owner though. This is why it is soo important to sign our tickets, or keep our tickets in a safe place because if someone else gets ahold of it and signs it, it's game over sadly for the rightful owner. They don't even need a signature just be in possession of that ticket. Signing my tickets ensures it game over for anyone else and rendered worthless to them.Big Grin

                  I would think video of me buying the ticket, plus my fingerprints on it, plus a photocopy would be sufficient to prove it's mine. After all, the lottery has awarded money to original owners who threw their ticket away and had a stranger claim it. My biggest worry if someone stole the ticket is if it would even be located (as the thief could just destroy it rather than risk cashing it). 

                  And from everything I've seen, the name on the back is the name that gets released. The name on the ticket would be a trustee/executor/etc. I've seen that as info listed on Texas specific lottery claims as well as from other states.

                    Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
                    Los Angeles, California
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                    Posted: December 31, 2013, 8:20 am - IP Logged
                    I disagree, if someone finds it, they will turn it in with hopes of being rewarded for doing so. If they don't, the ticket is worthless to them anyway because it's signed...so why wouldn't they turn it in knowing more then likely the owner of the ticket, who just won the JP, would reward them nicely for doing so?
                     
                    Proving that a ticket was stolen would be very very hard and one would have to have some hard evidence to prove differently. He said she said would not override a signature on a ticket. Think about it Jon, it's the purchasers responsibility to sign their ticket as well as what happens to their ticket. The lottery sees this as the responsibility of the purchaser, and the lottery goes out of their way to make sure the purchasers understands this by including on the very FIRST LINE first and foremost before anything else by stating this on the ticket as follows.

                    "This ticket is a bearer instrument. Sign ticket immediately after purchase to establish ownership." 

                    I think that puts to rest what the lottery recommends as far as SIGNING your ticket and WHY. It didn't say once your ticket is a winner sign it, it stated to sign it IMMEDIATELY after PURCHASE to establish OWNERSHIP.

                    To the rest of your comments, whether a person knows or not the value of their ticket is irrelevant to this conversation, but signing your ticket does indeed once again prove to protect players from dishonest clerks who prey on those knowing they don't know the value of their ticket.

                     

                    Why did you increase your font size? Stop SHOUTING, it doesn't make your point any stronger. Wink

                    You seem to have this idea of finders keepers in your head. I tried to gently nudge you in previous replies, but you seem to be sticking to your guns on this. But just because a clerk takes a ticket from a customer, and is then the bearer of that ticket and signs it, that does not mean that he is the rightful owner.

                    We live in a lawful and civilized society. We don't encourage thievery. Whether you are a waitress and find $1000 at your table, or a taxi driver and find $300,000 in your cab, you have an obligation to return it to the rightful owner or turn it in to the authorities. There are laws for this in fact, when finding items beyond a certain value.

                    In my state, there is no bearer instrument language on the tickets, and only a few lines down does it say to sign your ticket to indicate ownership. And our scratch tickets don't even say anything about signing.(though the lines for name and signature are there)

                      Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
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                      Posted: December 31, 2013, 8:22 am - IP Logged

                      Just to say again, because you are on camera purchasing that ticket does not establish ownership, the lottery has already told you how to do that, because what if a person bought it as a gift, stocking stuffer or used someone else's money for example, to purchase them tickets while they were at the store.  At the end of the day, who does the lottery believe, or do they need to? it's who is in possession of that ticket and whose signature is on that ticket...and the lottery tells you right on the ticket to establish your ownership immediately upon purchase, yet now this person wants to establish ownership now that it's a winner?...hmm good luck finding ground to stand on with that argument.

                      Sign your ticketsBlue Angel

                      You are new here, so you may not be aware of the multitude of stories where video evidence was used to establish that a customer was the rightful owner of a ticket instead of the thieving clerk who possessed, signed and tried to claim it.

                      Case in point, Bob Sehested:

                      http://www.lotterypost.com/news/145102

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9i8sKdbqQj0

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSvIvJzLTho

                      In this and many other cases, video evidence trumps possession and signature.

                      People can choose on their own when it is appropriate for them to sign their tickets, it is not for you to dictate to everyone. Who are you, the representative for the Sign Your Tickets Immediately After Purchase Society of America? Confused

                      Let people use their own common sense. I think LP members can do without New Members preaching to them on how they should act, thanks. Thumbs Up

                        Candlelight777's avatar - nw saucyelf.jpg
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                        Posted: December 31, 2013, 8:58 am - IP Logged

                        I would think video of me buying the ticket, plus my fingerprints on it, plus a photocopy would be sufficient to prove it's mine. After all, the lottery has awarded money to original owners who threw their ticket away and had a stranger claim it. My biggest worry if someone stole the ticket is if it would even be located (as the thief could just destroy it rather than risk cashing it). 

                        And from everything I've seen, the name on the back is the name that gets released. The name on the ticket would be a trustee/executor/etc. I've seen that as info listed on Texas specific lottery claims as well as from other states.

                        Personally, i think if someone stole it and then realized it was signed, they would resort to plan B and then claim they found it with hopes of a reward for turning it in. I think in most cases, a signature would more then likely be visible and serve as a deterrent because it would be worthless to them and too much of a risk getting caught trying to claim a reward.

                        If you feel comfortable that your methods will prevail without a need to sign your ticket in the event your ticket is lost or stolen, then your decision and what you feel is best for you is what matters. If your state lottery confirms that they will use the name on the ticket and not the legal name of the trust for who the proceeds will be paid to per the official legal claim forms, then i understand why you may opt to not sign your ticket if staying private is important to you. Staying private is my goal as wellThumbs Up. I am certainly not judging anyone's decision nor did you in anyway say i was, i just wanted to clarify that just in case and state i am only throwing out some food for thought and what i have learned from my state lottery.
                        I would like to think my tickets will never end up lost or stolen and that it won't happen to me, but way too many things in my life have proven otherwise that have happened that i would have never thought would...and enough lottery stories as a reminder it can.
                          Candlelight777's avatar - nw saucyelf.jpg
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                          Posted: December 31, 2013, 8:59 am - IP Logged

                          I apologize for the large font, i have eye problems and health conditions that causes my eyes to focus differently when i have flareups. I have gotten soo use to enlarging my print that i never really thought about how it may been seen as shouting. My apologizes.

                            Candlelight777's avatar - nw saucyelf.jpg
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                            Posted: December 31, 2013, 9:20 am - IP Logged

                            You are new here, so you may not be aware of the multitude of stories where video evidence was used to establish that a customer was the rightful owner of a ticket instead of the thieving clerk who possessed, signed and tried to claim it.

                            Case in point, Bob Sehested:

                            http://www.lotterypost.com/news/145102

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9i8sKdbqQj0

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSvIvJzLTho

                            In this and many other cases, video evidence trumps possession and signature.

                            People can choose on their own when it is appropriate for them to sign their tickets, it is not for you to dictate to everyone. Who are you, the representative for the Sign Your Tickets Immediately After Purchase Society of America? Confused

                            Let people use their own common sense. I think LP members can do without New Members preaching to them on how they should act, thanks. Thumbs Up

                            Jon, these are cases of a store clerk on camera committing fraud and caught in the act on camera....sigh...i give upBang Head!

                             

                            Good day Jon

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                              Posted: December 31, 2013, 1:54 pm - IP Logged

                              Why did you increase your font size? Stop SHOUTING, it doesn't make your point any stronger. Wink

                              You seem to have this idea of finders keepers in your head. I tried to gently nudge you in previous replies, but you seem to be sticking to your guns on this. But just because a clerk takes a ticket from a customer, and is then the bearer of that ticket and signs it, that does not mean that he is the rightful owner.

                              We live in a lawful and civilized society. We don't encourage thievery. Whether you are a waitress and find $1000 at your table, or a taxi driver and find $300,000 in your cab, you have an obligation to return it to the rightful owner or turn it in to the authorities. There are laws for this in fact, when finding items beyond a certain value.

                              In my state, there is no bearer instrument language on the tickets, and only a few lines down does it say to sign your ticket to indicate ownership. And our scratch tickets don't even say anything about signing.(though the lines for name and signature are there)

                              "In my state, there is no bearer instrument language on the tickets, and only a few lines down does it say to sign your ticket to indicate ownership."

                              The majority of wins are under $600 and the value of the tickets are determined by bar codes. My state says to immediately sign the the ticket because it's a receipt, but it doesn't prove the signer bought the ticket. Is there a logical reason to sign the back of one of those tickets when the name of the ticket holder is irrelevant?

                              Even if signing the ticket proves ownership, a photo ID is not required when cashing those tickets so again any signature on the back is worthless. The best advice is probably to sign the back of the tickets as the clerk is handing them to you, but based on many of the court rulings, a signature doesn't prove sole ownership.