Lottery scammer who later won shot, killed

Jan 20, 2008, 12:22 am (13 comments)

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A Fort Lauderdale man who once went to jail for making fake lottery tickets — and then won a million-dollar prize for real — died from a gunshot wound.

Anthony Soltys, convicted felon and instant millionaire, died as mysteriously as he lived.

Soltys died Friday afternoon from a gunshot wound he received the night before in Fort Lauderdale.

Police are searching for the person or persons that left him to die in the middle of Northeast Fourth Avenue, in the 1700 block.

Soltys was taken to Broward General Medical Center in critical condition, and succumbed to the injuries about 2:30 p.m. Friday.

The 47-year-old Fort Lauderdale man leaves behind a criminal history — and perhaps the remains of a once-hefty fortune.

In 1988, Soltys was arrested on charges of counterfeiting/altering lottery tickets. He pleaded guilty, receiving probation, but was sent to jail in September 1989 after violating it.

He was locked up for two months, according to a records search, and moved out of state soon thereafter.

Five years later, he and his partner, James M. Lynch, won a New York State lottery prize — splitting $2.2 million.

Lynch and Soltys, who were together for at least 12 years, bought the winning ticket for the July 2, 1994, drawing.

Despite his past, which included a drug conviction in 1992, Soltys was able to cash the winning, valid ticket.

"If they're lucky enough to win, they're entitled to collect the prize," New York State Lottery spokesman John Charleson said of ex-cons.

Money didn't buy him stability.

By 2006, Soltys was back in court and possibly broke.

In February of that year, he sold the remaining payments of his lotto winnings to Peach Holdings, which allows recipients of future cash flows — including lottery payments — to collect the money up front, for an estimated $200,000. It is unknown how much, if any, of that was left at the time of his death.

Soltys was also named in a civil domestic violence lawsuit brought by Lynch later in 2006.

Soltys and Lynch shared a home. A judge awarded Lynch possession of the home and their two dogs, according to court records.

Lynch could not be reached for comment, but a friend of Lynch's called Soltys "bad news," claiming he was mixed up in drugs.

Police say it is too early to say whether his past had any bearing on the shooting.

It is also unknown how long he was left bleeding in the middle of the road.

Authorities are asking anyone with knowledge of Soltys' whereabouts Thursday to call Detective Mark Shotwell at 954-828-5517, Detective Jim Jaggers at 954-828-5970, or Broward County CrimeStoppers at 954-493-8477.

Miami Herald

Comments

justxploring's avatarjustxploring

Nobody should be left alone on the street to die.  It's unfortunate that he lived such a sad existence when so many people would take that money and begin a new, happy life.  However, he was old enough to make decisions and followed the path he chose to walk. 

Maybe now he'll find some peace.

Coin Toss's avatarCoin Toss

Well if A & E / Discovery makes another Curse of the Lottery program I'm sure this guy will be in it.

jeffrey's avatarjeffrey

Quote: Originally posted by justxploring on Jan 20, 2008

Nobody should be left alone on the street to die.  It's unfortunate that he lived such a sad existence when so many people would take that money and begin a new, happy life.  However, he was old enough to make decisions and followed the path he chose to walk. 

Maybe now he'll find some peace.

My college professor who employed me during my undergraduate years was the victim of a hit and run and left in a ditch for 2 days to die and to my knowledge he didn't win the lottery. He was nice and I get angry that anyone would do that. God, he wasn't perfect but he was nice and very human. Bad things happen to good people all the time.

justxploring's avatarjustxploring

Quote: Originally posted by jeffrey on Jan 20, 2008

My college professor who employed me during my undergraduate years was the victim of a hit and run and left in a ditch for 2 days to die and to my knowledge he didn't win the lottery. He was nice and I get angry that anyone would do that. God, he wasn't perfect but he was nice and very human. Bad things happen to good people all the time.

Wow, Jeffrey.  Where did that come from?  I didn't say that people who die that way are bad!  That's absurd.  I was referring to the story of a man who was addicted to drugs and was shot in the street.  This is an article about a man who won the lottery and had nothing after a year.

My friend's husband was shot to death in a convenient store. Of course I know lots of bad things happen to good people.  (I'm one of them!)   All you have to do is turn on the news and read about children being tossed off bridges to know life can be unkind to even the most innocent.

chasingadream's avatarchasingadream

soooo soooo sad

LckyLary

You are the product of whatever decisions you made up until now. We don't know what the circumstances of this incident were, but this person was apparently not heading in a good direction from the get-go. I will speculate that he was shot from a distance by someone not wanting to get too close or who wanted  a headstart to get away.

pumpi76

This should teach us all a lesson: "becareful what you wish for...."   Thaught me a lesson...

justxploring's avatarjustxploring

True, Pumpi, but if it's done with the best intentions, there is nothing wrong with wishing.  We are taught to close our eyes and make a wish from early childhood, blowing out the candles on our birthday cakes.  I would never say to a child "be careful what you wish for."  Let's say a child wishes for a puppy.  That child must understand that a puppy is a responsibility and needs to be fed and walked.  We don't know this man or what his life was like, but I can promise you that, if I wish for a million dollars, and I win it, I will not be sorry.  Maybe something bad will happen to me.  As Jeffrey wrote, bad things will happen. However,  having money will not be the reason for my demise.

phaseven's avatarphaseven

They paid the man and knew of what he have done in the past ?

LottoAce's avatarLottoAce

Quote: Originally posted by phaseven on Jan 21, 2008

They paid the man and knew of what he have done in the past ?

exactly!!!

"If they're lucky enough to win, they're entitled to collect the prize," New York State Lottery spokesman John Charleson said of ex-cons.

the above statement makes me sick!

The N.C. Lottery board had a similiar case last year. an Ex-Convict won a million dollars by matching all five white balls with the powerplay option.

quess what?...because of a stipulation in his parole contract stating "no gambling" they didn't pay him!!!.

Now obviously the Florida man must have not been on parole, or the laws are different in Fla. who cares?

bottom line

once a thug always a thug!

I'm so sick of hearing about criminal rights...and that we should show sympathy towards dead thugs like that!!!..

what about the rights of hard working honest citizens? why not show some compasion for individuals caught up in the 48% increase of Home Forclosures this year! 

if Criminals wanted to be treated with sympathy....

THEY WOULD STOP BREAKING THE &%(#$@^ LAW!!! 

MMMUUUUAAAAAHHHHHH

KyMystikal's avatarKyMystikal

Quote: Originally posted by LottoAce on Jan 21, 2008

exactly!!!

"If they're lucky enough to win, they're entitled to collect the prize," New York State Lottery spokesman John Charleson said of ex-cons.

the above statement makes me sick!

The N.C. Lottery board had a similiar case last year. an Ex-Convict won a million dollars by matching all five white balls with the powerplay option.

quess what?...because of a stipulation in his parole contract stating "no gambling" they didn't pay him!!!.

Now obviously the Florida man must have not been on parole, or the laws are different in Fla. who cares?

bottom line

once a thug always a thug!

I'm so sick of hearing about criminal rights...and that we should show sympathy towards dead thugs like that!!!..

what about the rights of hard working honest citizens? why not show some compasion for individuals caught up in the 48% increase of Home Forclosures this year! 

if Criminals wanted to be treated with sympathy....

THEY WOULD STOP BREAKING THE &%(#$@^ LAW!!! 

MMMUUUUAAAAAHHHHHH

I don't agree with your once a thug always a thug. People do change.  Some people make mistakes and learn from them. This person apparently didn't learn anything and probably was shot during a drug transaction.

lottocalgal's avatarlottocalgal

Quote: Originally posted by LottoAce on Jan 21, 2008

exactly!!!

"If they're lucky enough to win, they're entitled to collect the prize," New York State Lottery spokesman John Charleson said of ex-cons.

the above statement makes me sick!

The N.C. Lottery board had a similiar case last year. an Ex-Convict won a million dollars by matching all five white balls with the powerplay option.

quess what?...because of a stipulation in his parole contract stating "no gambling" they didn't pay him!!!.

Now obviously the Florida man must have not been on parole, or the laws are different in Fla. who cares?

bottom line

once a thug always a thug!

I'm so sick of hearing about criminal rights...and that we should show sympathy towards dead thugs like that!!!..

what about the rights of hard working honest citizens? why not show some compasion for individuals caught up in the 48% increase of Home Forclosures this year! 

if Criminals wanted to be treated with sympathy....

THEY WOULD STOP BREAKING THE &%(#$@^ LAW!!! 

MMMUUUUAAAAAHHHHHH

Here, here.  I totally agree.  I am soooo sick of people who are the worst scum of the earth getting lucky and getting the breaks in life.  What ever happened to Karma?  I hate to keep bringing him up but look at  David Edwards; he was a slug before he won,  then proved that he was still a slug after the win.  Decent people in this world  always seem to get the crap end of things.  You try to do right by life and you get nothing, no breaks.  It pisses me off. ( speaking as a FORMER subprime MTG underwriter who is now out of a job). We tried to tell them.  Our bosses would NOT let us decline applications for 1st time home buyers with 580 scores who claimed $15,000 per month income -these were gardeners and house cleaners who wanted a 100% stated income deal and trying to purchase a $600,000 home.  The deals funded then all went into a first payment default.  We tried to tell them. Now we are all paying the price, a heavy price.

 

Sorry for venting.  I'm just fed up is all.

benir4u's avatarbenir4u

Quote: Originally posted by phaseven on Jan 21, 2008

They paid the man and knew of what he have done in the past ?

Phaseven, I know what you mean, I was under the impression that if you have a felony dealing with the lottery that you aren't allow to play anymore, interesting.  Depending on the state he might have been eligible because he won the money in a different state.

End of comments
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