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Man gets 23 years for robbing Illinois lottery winner

Topic closed. 33 replies. Last post 6 years ago by HaveABall.

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HaveABall's avatar - rocket

United States
Member #72448
March 18, 2009
1228 Posts
Offline
Posted: April 4, 2011, 11:01 am - IP Logged

If you do a Google search for Carmine Palella of Palatine, you can find an earlier story on the Daily Herald website.  The victim won $100,000.  That's it.  100k. 

One problem with this story, and stories like it, is the media uses the generic phrase "lottery winner" as though it has a specific meaning, like you can use it as a descriptor and everyone knows what they're talking about.  My first thought when I read the story was, "How many millions we talking about?"  Turns out the man didn't have enough money to enact any of the plans you see in these comments, move to a gated community, for example.  100k after taxes (35% federal, 3% state of Illinois (raised this year to 5%  Ouch!)) isn't enough to drastically change your life, unless you really have nothing when you win. For a working person, that amount of money might not even be enough to pay off their home. 

The article doesn't say, but I imagine that quite a chunk of his money, if any was left, went to medical bills.  Talk about compounding your tragedy.

I Agree!

Having several millions of dollars in my financial accounts means receiving several valuable services each day!

Disney

    HaveABall's avatar - rocket

    United States
    Member #72448
    March 18, 2009
    1228 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: April 4, 2011, 11:23 am - IP Logged

    There are two kinds of jackpot winners...the ones who remained anonymous and the ones that wish they had.

    I like to be the unknown, will the government allow you to do so?

    comments please

     

     

         Evil Looking     Hyper

    Rant

    The only way to determine is to flip over your lottery chance ticket, get a magnifying glass, and read it (probably a few times, since they are uniquely phrased).  Seriously, each state has different writing on the back of their ticket, even if it is a multi-state game! It is a good idea to read them every 6 months or so, as a state may change phrasing at any time.  After this, you may call your state's lottery hotline to inquire about key phrasing to receive their definition of phrases that could mean a few things.  You will see how vague the writing is.  Thereafter, it is good to call the hotline, they will answer quickly and if they don't know complex question's answer about tax rate %s or whatever, the rep will courteously transfer you to rep that does or allow you to leave a specific voicemail for that person ... who calls back usually within a few working hours.  It was a positive experience for me.

    Further, once one reads the back of their lottery chance ticket (more than once if buying them in more than one state) that person will learn EXACTLY what is being agreed to if when claiming a 1st or 2nd place prize!  However, even though one knows this, when they win multi-millions of dollars, they would still anonymously seek a few tax attorney and financial planner's free consultancy BEFORE they claim their ticket (just in case two or so trusts have to be created and processed by the state first a few weeks prior to claim), and wait the 2-4 weeks to have the money wired to their designated banking account thereafter.  When one wins net multi-millions, it is a rush, but not to claim, rather to gain consultancy before claiming.

    Having several millions of dollars in my financial accounts means receiving several valuable services each day!

    Disney

      Avatar
      Baton Rouge, LA
      United States
      Member #4602
      May 7, 2004
      699 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: April 5, 2011, 10:44 pm - IP Logged

      If I were to win the lottery, I'd try to claim anonymously.  In my state, a person can't claim anonymously, but they can claim using a trust or a corporation, and many have.  Although these methods aren't completely anonymous and someone could find out who is behind the trust, it makes harder than just opening up the newspaper or checking the state lottery website.  I think most states allow these methods, but there are a few that don't.

      I wouldn't necessarily be concerned with someone trying to rob my home, but I'd be concerned about the con artists and the moochers with phony sob stories and other problems.  I remember reading about an American lottery winner who after it was announced, got a call from Indonesia asking him for money.  Another story, I think it was here I read it, was about someone who bought a truck from a dealership at a good price and when the manager found out they'd won the lottery, he went back on the deal and insisted they either pay full price or not get the truck, so they walked out and got it elsewhere.

      If I do win, what I would do is claim anonymously, get everything paid off and my money situated and if I have enough to quit my job, I'd probably wait around 6 months after the excitement has died down to do so, again not to raise suspicion.  Afterwards, I'd probably lead a quiet life, still living in my modest home, driving my little economy car, and just be happy.

      I'm just hoping if my lottery pool at work wins, that the other members will agree with me and want to do the same thing.  I've talked about it with a couple of them and they understand, but there are 13 of us and I'm not sure everyone else will agree.  I just hope they don't want the press conference, etc.  I don't want to draw too much attention to myself.

      Prisoner Six

      "I am not a number, I am a free man!"

        HaveABall's avatar - rocket

        United States
        Member #72448
        March 18, 2009
        1228 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: April 6, 2011, 10:22 pm - IP Logged

        If you do a Google search for Carmine Palella of Palatine, you can find an earlier story on the Daily Herald website.  The victim won $100,000.  That's it.  100k. 

        One problem with this story, and stories like it, is the media uses the generic phrase "lottery winner" as though it has a specific meaning, like you can use it as a descriptor and everyone knows what they're talking about.  My first thought when I read the story was, "How many millions we talking about?"  Turns out the man didn't have enough money to enact any of the plans you see in these comments, move to a gated community, for example.  100k after taxes (35% federal, 3% state of Illinois (raised this year to 5%  Ouch!)) isn't enough to drastically change your life, unless you really have nothing when you win. For a working person, that amount of money might not even be enough to pay off their home. 

        The article doesn't say, but I imagine that quite a chunk of his money, if any was left, went to medical bills.  Talk about compounding your tragedy.

        I Agree! It's so astounding to have your back door area destroyed, your friend's memories scarred for life, yourself shot twice in the chest AND twice somewhere else on your body, AND after probably have already spent MOST of the measly $65,000 dollars net actually RECEIVED a year earlier from the lottery win.  Who would keep more than $500 cash in their home anyhow, as most folks prefer simpler debit or credit cards or checks?

        Jeez, reminds me about the people who are shot, stabbed, and often die for a theft of $5 or so.  Tragic, the attacker's bullets and the knife must have cost MORE than that ... plus, the running from police and bounty hunters for the rest of your life, if not caught, odd!

        Having several millions of dollars in my financial accounts means receiving several valuable services each day!

        Disney