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Indiana woman claims Blue Chip Casino owes her $28M

Topic closed. 95 replies. Last post 3 years ago by Stack47.

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Kentucky
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Member #32652
February 14, 2006
7318 Posts
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Posted: February 14, 2014, 3:22 pm - IP Logged

Thanks noise-gate. Saylorgirl pretty well described the scenario in her post.

Also let me add if there was such a jackpot that machine would have been under surveillance from the eye in the sky and people on the floor.

The Tropicana in Vegs had a slot that had a $2M jackpot. Every time it jammed and they had to call a slot mechanic there was the mechanic and two security people. One of the mechanics was an absolute nervous wreck when he worked on that one slot.

For the people in this thread saying the woman should get paid, what is it she should get paid for?

"For the people in this thread saying the woman should get paid, what is it she should get paid for?"

Those saying it are just as inexperienced with playing slot machines and using player cards as Carmin.

"And she says a casino employee saw it. "She was next to me. All I heard and saw, she started screaming 'supervisor!' at the top of her lungs. So I saw the numbers, heard 'supervisor!'"

The story makes it look like Carmin matched the winning symbols on the slot machine, but she misread what was scrolling across the rewards card screen. I doubt you were trained to scream "supervisor" even when a jackpot was won.

    Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
    Zeta Reticuli Star System
    United States
    Member #30470
    January 17, 2006
    10353 Posts
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    Posted: February 15, 2014, 1:15 am - IP Logged

    Not $28 million mistakes, but mistakes are made everyday in casinos. Dealers over pay and under play players and the floor person usually straightens it out. There are players who complain they are not being paid correctly when they are. There is always arguments with the one roll prop bets in Craps. The gaming commissions have their rules and regs,  the casinos have procedures, and a steak dinner is probably appropriate under the circumstances in this story.

    Stack47,

    Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

    Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

    In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

    Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

    One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

    There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

    There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

    CDanaT,

    Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

    Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

    Here's one for all you guys:

    Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

    After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

    //

    I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

    Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

    Lep

    There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

      sully16's avatar - sharan
      Ringleader
      Michigan
      United States
      Member #81740
      October 28, 2009
      40566 Posts
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      Posted: February 15, 2014, 6:04 am - IP Logged

      Stack47,

      Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

      Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

      In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

      Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

      One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

      There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

      There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

      CDanaT,

      Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

      Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

      Here's one for all you guys:

      Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

      After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

      //

      I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

      Wow, this is interesting.

      Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

      For a lead role in a cage?

       

                                                  From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

        Saylorgirl's avatar - Lottery-065.jpg
        Indiana
        United States
        Member #129225
        June 13, 2012
        546 Posts
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        Posted: February 15, 2014, 7:31 am - IP Logged

        Stack47,

        Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

        Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

        In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

        Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

        One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

        There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

        There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

        CDanaT,

        Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

        Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

        Here's one for all you guys:

        Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

        After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

        //

        I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

        Thanks for all that info it was a very intersting read.

          rdgrnr's avatar - walt
          Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
          United States
          Member #73904
          April 28, 2009
          14903 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: February 15, 2014, 8:29 am - IP Logged

          Stack47,

          Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

          Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

          In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

          Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

          One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

          There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

          There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

          CDanaT,

          Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

          Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

          Here's one for all you guys:

          Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

          After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

          //

          I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

          Interesting stuff, CT, thanks.

          Have ya got enough of that kinda stuff for a book?

          Me and you could make a fortune!

            CDanaT's avatar - tiger avatar_04_hd_pictures_169016.jpg
            TX
            United States
            Member #121193
            January 4, 2012
            1637 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: February 15, 2014, 11:16 am - IP Logged

            Stack47,

            Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

            Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

            In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

            Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

            One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

            There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

            There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

            CDanaT,

            Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

            Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

            Here's one for all you guys:

            Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

            After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

            //

            I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

            Thanks CT.....great info......keep em comin'

            Stay Positive, Believe and good things will come your way

              Avatar

              United States
              Member #94616
              July 24, 2010
              4735 Posts
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              Posted: February 15, 2014, 11:47 am - IP Logged

              Stack47,

              Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

              Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

              In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

              Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

              One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

              There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

              There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

              CDanaT,

              Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

              Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

              Here's one for all you guys:

              Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

              After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

              //

              I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

              GREAT stories & insite on this issue!! THANKS! Thumbs Up

                Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                Zeta Reticuli Star System
                United States
                Member #30470
                January 17, 2006
                10353 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: February 15, 2014, 9:09 pm - IP Logged

                Thanks for the compliments folks.

                People seem to like these stories so here's two more.

                Every year the Nevada Gaming Control Board (http://gaming.nv.gov/) publishes a report on ways of cheating that peoplel got caught at.

                At one casino security was checking the parking lot and saw a camper with the door open and a tv on. But the tv was showing one of the blackjack tables in the casino. Security stopped and the two guys on the camper said, "Come on in." Incredible. Their partner inside the casino had a canera in his belt buckle and was sending pictures of what the dealer across the pit was dealing and the dealer's cards. Security couldn't believe these guys were sharp enough to set up such an operation but yet invited them inside.

                Casinos are always leery of blackjack players in wheelchairs because often they do the same kind of thing, signaling to a partner on a tablr on the opposite side of the pit. Many of them fake nedding a wheelchair.

                Another one was these guys got their own roulette ball into a game. It contained electronics that would take a signal when to drop. It couldn't always hit specific numbers but it could hit panels, sections of the wheel. So one night they've got a streak going, their winning a lot, AND THEN THE BALL EXPLODED!

                Then of course there's the clowns that try to put their own card into a game and don't notice their cards have a different color on the back than the ones the casino is using.

                Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                Lep

                There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                  RedStang's avatar - tallman zps6gf4inoc.jpg
                  NY
                  United States
                  Member #121961
                  January 21, 2012
                  3157 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: February 15, 2014, 9:17 pm - IP Logged

                  One time at Foxwoods casino there was a slot machine that had it's bin full of coins and no one was around. I looked at it for a minute and always wondered if it was a set up.

                    LottoMetro's avatar - Lottery-024.jpg
                    Happyland
                    United States
                    Member #146344
                    September 1, 2013
                    1129 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: February 15, 2014, 9:34 pm - IP Logged

                    Thanks for the compliments folks.

                    People seem to like these stories so here's two more.

                    Every year the Nevada Gaming Control Board (http://gaming.nv.gov/) publishes a report on ways of cheating that peoplel got caught at.

                    At one casino security was checking the parking lot and saw a camper with the door open and a tv on. But the tv was showing one of the blackjack tables in the casino. Security stopped and the two guys on the camper said, "Come on in." Incredible. Their partner inside the casino had a canera in his belt buckle and was sending pictures of what the dealer across the pit was dealing and the dealer's cards. Security couldn't believe these guys were sharp enough to set up such an operation but yet invited them inside.

                    Casinos are always leery of blackjack players in wheelchairs because often they do the same kind of thing, signaling to a partner on a tablr on the opposite side of the pit. Many of them fake nedding a wheelchair.

                    Another one was these guys got their own roulette ball into a game. It contained electronics that would take a signal when to drop. It couldn't always hit specific numbers but it could hit panels, sections of the wheel. So one night they've got a streak going, their winning a lot, AND THEN THE BALL EXPLODED!

                    Then of course there's the clowns that try to put their own card into a game and don't notice their cards have a different color on the back than the ones the casino is using.

                    lol...this reminds me of last year when a group hacked into casino's surveillance feed for a high-stakes table and used it to see opponents' poker cards. They ended up getting about $32 million.

                    If the chances of winning the jackpot are so slim, why play when the jackpot is so small? Your chances never change, but the potential payoff does.
                    If a crystal ball showed you the future of the rest of your life, and in that future you will never win a jackpot, would you still play?

                    2016: -48.28% (13 tickets) ||
                    P&L % = Total Win($)/Total Wager($) - 1

                      Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                      Zeta Reticuli Star System
                      United States
                      Member #30470
                      January 17, 2006
                      10353 Posts
                      Offline
                      Posted: February 15, 2014, 11:28 pm - IP Logged

                      Re: the OP, here's slot machine malfunction FAQs from the Nevada Gamin Control Board. Granted it's not Indiana, but the same info. applies:

                      FAQs - Slot Machine Malfunctions

                      The goal and objective of the Nevada Gaming Control Board is to ensure that gaming is conducted honestly and competitively and the public has confidence and trust in the gaming industry. In other words, we want the games to be fair and patrons to have a good time.
                      What do I do when a slot machine I am playing malfunctions?
                      Why are people denied a jackpot payment when a slot machine malfunctions?
                      What happens when a slot machine malfunctions?
                      Why do slot machines malfunction (tilt)?
                      Q: What do I do when a slot machine I am playing malfunctions?
                      A:

                      The first thing you do is contact a casino employee. If there is a question of whether or not you have won a jackpot and you dispute the casino's response you may telephone the Gaming Control Board's Enforcement Division. An agent will arbitrate the dispute. If your dispute with the casino is for $500 or more, and cannot be settled, the casino is required to notify the Gaming Control Board.

                      Q: Why are people denied a jackpot payment when a slot machine malfunctions?
                      A:
                      With each pull of the handle, or push of the button, a slot machine begins the process of randomly selecting the next alignment of symbols. If a slot machine malfunctions it cannot complete the random selection process, and therefore reverts to a "tilt" mode. When a malfunction occurs some slot machine manufacturers, for engineering purposes, set the reels to stop briefly in a "jackpot" position. When this happens a player may see the reels momentarily stop at a jackpot alignment and then go into a slow spin. This often causes the player to believe a jackpot has been won. In recent years slot machine manufacturers have changed the "stop" location to other than a jackpot alignment to help prevent the misunderstanding.
                      Q: What happens when a slot machine malfunctions?
                      A:
                      When a malfunction occurs the slot machine will normally not accept additional coins nor play existing credits, the lights on top will flash, the readout on the face of the machine will likely flash or display an unusual number or code (example: 3300 code), the reels may stop briefly then rotate or spin slowly, or there may be an on-screen indication of the problem, such as "hopper empty" or "call attendant."
                      Q: Why do slot machines malfunction (tilt)?
                      A:
                      There are over 209,000 slot machines normally operating 24 hours a day 7 days a week in Nevada and unfortunately, on rare occasions, there are malfunctions. Malfunctions occur for a variety of reasons including, improper tampering, coin jams, empty hoppers, switch failures, computer chip failure, power outages and accidental contact (bumping).

                      http://gaming.nv.gov/index.aspx?page=70#6

                      If you want to poke around that site there's some pretty interesting stuff, especially under Divisions, Enforcement Division

                      http://gaming.nv.gov/index.aspx?page=1

                      Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                      Lep

                      There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                        Avatar
                        Kentucky
                        United States
                        Member #32652
                        February 14, 2006
                        7318 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: February 17, 2014, 12:22 pm - IP Logged

                        "some of these smaller casinos have a bank of penny slot machines"

                        "I was told "3300" is an error code and they paid me $500." 

                          LOL

                        Q: What happens when a slot machine malfunctions?

                        A: When a malfunction occurs the slot machine will normally not accept additional coins nor play existing credits, the lights on top will flash, the readout on the face of the machine will likely flash or display an unusual number or code (example: 3300 code), the reels may stop briefly then rotate or spin slowly, or there may be an on-screen indication of the problem, such as "hopper empty" or "call attendant."
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                          Posted: February 17, 2014, 12:40 pm - IP Logged

                          Interesting stuff, CT, thanks.

                          Have ya got enough of that kinda stuff for a book?

                          Me and you could make a fortune!

                          "Have ya got enough of that kinda stuff for a book?"

                          That "kinda stuff" came out of someone else's book and lots of it was reinacted on TV shows.

                          "Me and you could make a fortune"

                          Why not just save time put your name over the author's?

                            helpmewin's avatar - dandy
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                            Posted: February 17, 2014, 12:58 pm - IP Logged

                            "Have ya got enough of that kinda stuff for a book?"

                            That "kinda stuff" came out of someone else's book and lots of it was reinacted on TV shows.

                            "Me and you could make a fortune"

                            Why not just save time put your name over the author's?

                            LOL

                            Let it Snow Snowman

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                              February 14, 2006
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                              Posted: February 17, 2014, 2:04 pm - IP Logged

                              Stack47,

                              Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat.

                              Players who complain they got shorted when they didn't are known as 'claim jumpers'. Another part of that is claim jumpers look for toursits who appear to not know the game and claim those players' winning bets. Once a person establishes themselves as a known claim jumper the casino will purposely not pay them and call security when they raise a ruckus (at least in the old days).

                              In a situation like the one in the OP the girl calling for the supervisor was doing her job, she saw a claim coming.

                              Casinos not only have the 'eye in the sky' but the 'eye in the rug'. These are plain clothes security and surveillance people. Good luck to people who put in a baloney claim and have these people as eyewitnesses they didn't know about. Often they try to steal purses of women playuing slots or their buckets full of won coins, then happen to 'stumble' right into somebody who knocke them on their keister.

                              One time in a casino in downtoen Vegas everyone playing the slots in one section was a cop, Nevada Gaming Board, or casino surveillance. They were waiting to bust this one guy when he showed up and descended on him like a plague of locusts.

                              There's is a Nevada law called 'defruading an innkeeper' and many a claim jumper or just ignorsnt tourist with a bad attitude and less knowledge of a game than they thought they had has been given a ride downtown under that law.

                              There's  lot more I could tell you but since so many here are self-proclaimned casino 'experts' here there's no real point, is there? Seems like quite a few in this thread just want the casino to pay out $28M on a claim just to see someone 'get over' on the man.

                              CDanaT,

                              Here's one of the similar cases. Caesar's Palace, late 1980s. A family from Arkanasa is playing a Megabucks slot machine, taking turns. Big jackpot, $1.9M, constant surveillance. The son takes his turn and hits the jackpot. Thing is, he was 19 years old, too young to play in Nevada. He was alo 6'5" and had a full beard so nobody got on him because he looked old enough.

                              Caesars' wants to pay him but the Nevada Gaming Board says no.

                              Here's one for all you guys:

                              Midwestern Riverboat. A couple blew their money and came up with a brilliant idea to get some money out of the casino. The husband goes up to the observation deck, puts a banana peel in front of the door. His wife comes out, 'slips' on the banan peel, and they call for help.

                              After security chekcs her out the couple say they are going to sue the boat. They are brought down to the office and the shift manager and security tell them they want to shoe them something. The whole things was on a surveillance video. Now all the casino people in the office are laughing like the guys in a scene in Porky's and they ask the couple if they still wantt to sue the boat. And then they tell them if the agree not to they won't charge them with fraud and have them arrested.

                              //

                              I think that couple may be posting in this thread, I'm just not sure of their username.

                              "Over payments are known as 'leakage' and it's just an accepted part of doing business, but when the leakage gets enough to be noticed everybody gets heat."

                              $28 million added to a player's reward card is probably considered more than just "leakage" especially if there is a chance the player has a legitimate case. In most states the gaming rules and regulations favor the casinos about the same way lottery rules and regs favor state lotteries. Whatever the ruling won't prevent a law suit.