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Win with Magic ( numbers and more)

Topic closed. 384 replies. Last post 5 years ago by sully16.

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PATTYH's avatar - animal doggy2.jpg
KNOXVILLE,TN.
United States
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September 30, 2010
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Posted: August 25, 2011, 5:38 pm - IP Logged

Hi Patty, Glad you like the thread, Truth be told, sometimes we cause our own bad luck , we don't even realize it sometimes, maybe you can start a journal about your decision making, I know it sounds silly, but when you go and read it later it will make sense.

Things to consider, write down how you feel at the time of a financial decisions, are you sad, angry, hungry, tired, try to express to  your exact emotion, keep a log for a week, go back and figure out what emotion is driving you, and thats the one you work on changing.

In the meantime, try to think more positive, actually stop and try to make the best of any situation, also, keep in mind, maybe diet and exercise, with meditation and yoga,  relaxing your mind is a good thing, meditation will help give you focus.

More humor, laughter is also good medicine.

Good luck Patty.

Sully  I like to think I  have a open mind, and I do let alot of stuff roll off my back. I will do a journal. let me say long story made short, opened a truck  loan for stepson , dui jail, truck seized ,  but   really thats life and theres alot of people have  it worst  , I ll pay it and move on.  I think it is true you make your on luck,  As ridg would do ,i just sat back open a beer and wait for the  roll of the dice. thanks i WILL BE positive!

    eddessaknight's avatar - nw paladin.jpg
    LAS VEGAS
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    Member #47729
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    Posted: August 25, 2011, 10:12 pm - IP Logged

    Hi Sully16,Harvest Moon,    I was wondering , this has been a unlucky year for me ! What can I do to get my karma , mojo , ect. back. B-day 4-16-1960.  thank you both. love the thread

    Greetings Patty,

    Just read your SOS & wanted to take the liberty of making a few pratical suggestions along with our encouraging Sully & Moon.

    1. take any current problem & think about it (not worry)  night & day razor focused -ask for answers before sleeping, wake up have breakfast return to thinking about same relaxed, no strain...let that be your problem solving biz plan.... and repeat etc

    2. alternatively.for stress & blood pressure reduction bio feedback & answers try simple mediation. This is opposite to #1 by clearing your mind of all thoughts, feelings, anxieties you  may just open the door to your own heavenly prime source download. There is plenty of how to meditate materials on line or in your library. Takes conserted efffort & practice but  very well worth the time.

    Hope these humble but straightforwar time tried recommendations will help

     

    Blessings of Peace & Prosprtity,

    EddessaKnightSun Smiley

      PATTYH's avatar - animal doggy2.jpg
      KNOXVILLE,TN.
      United States
      Member #98065
      September 30, 2010
      209 Posts
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      Posted: August 26, 2011, 9:01 am - IP Logged

      Greetings Patty,

      Just read your SOS & wanted to take the liberty of making a few pratical suggestions along with our encouraging Sully & Moon.

      1. take any current problem & think about it (not worry)  night & day razor focused -ask for answers before sleeping, wake up have breakfast return to thinking about same relaxed, no strain...let that be your problem solving biz plan.... and repeat etc

      2. alternatively.for stress & blood pressure reduction bio feedback & answers try simple mediation. This is opposite to #1 by clearing your mind of all thoughts, feelings, anxieties you  may just open the door to your own heavenly prime source download. There is plenty of how to meditate materials on line or in your library. Takes conserted efffort & practice but  very well worth the time.

      Hope these humble but straightforwar time tried recommendations will help

       

      Blessings of Peace & Prosprtity,

      EddessaKnightSun Smiley

      Thank you eddessaknight,   I opened a journal (Sully) and wrote all the neg. events of the day down,looked it over and let it go out of mind,body (felt better) and  what I do have ,family,friends,home,pets job. So today is a new day to enjoy the beauty of what the Lord offers to us all everyday. You are right  think about it , its not the end of the world.   everything has a season .I ll take care of one thing at a time, if it can't be fixed I'll let it go. Sorry to have vented,  when you ask for help ,it will come .I just needed to get focused .be  positive . THANK YOU eddessaknight, Sully, I feel much better.  Patty

        sully16's avatar - sharan
        Ringleader
        Michigan
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        Posted: August 26, 2011, 9:34 am - IP Logged

        Thank you eddessaknight,   I opened a journal (Sully) and wrote all the neg. events of the day down,looked it over and let it go out of mind,body (felt better) and  what I do have ,family,friends,home,pets job. So today is a new day to enjoy the beauty of what the Lord offers to us all everyday. You are right  think about it , its not the end of the world.   everything has a season .I ll take care of one thing at a time, if it can't be fixed I'll let it go. Sorry to have vented,  when you ask for help ,it will come .I just needed to get focused .be  positive . THANK YOU eddessaknight, Sully, I feel much better.  Patty

        Patty feel free to pm me, sometimes venting can make it better, your not alone honey, we have all been through some tough times. I may not have any advice, but I will most certainly give you time and a shoulder. Be well.

        Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

        For a lead role in a cage?

         

                                                    From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

          PATTYH's avatar - animal doggy2.jpg
          KNOXVILLE,TN.
          United States
          Member #98065
          September 30, 2010
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          Posted: August 26, 2011, 11:01 am - IP Logged

          Patty feel free to pm me, sometimes venting can make it better, your not alone honey, we have all been through some tough times. I may not have any advice, but I will most certainly give you time and a shoulder. Be well.

          Oh Sully thank you, this morning I'am writing down good and positive things that happens as I go thur my day. However great or small. included posts  from you and eddessaknight. thanks for the helpful support. life is good Patty

            sully16's avatar - sharan
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            Posted: August 31, 2011, 10:08 pm - IP Logged

            Oh Sully thank you, this morning I'am writing down good and positive things that happens as I go thur my day. However great or small. included posts  from you and eddessaknight. thanks for the helpful support. life is good Patty

            Keep up the positive energy, Hope all is wellSun Smiley

            Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

            For a lead role in a cage?

             

                                                        From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

              sully16's avatar - sharan
              Ringleader
              Michigan
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              Posted: September 8, 2011, 1:19 pm - IP Logged

              Collecting Acorns during the fall , will insure a wealthy , healthy winter.

              Eating stewed tomatoes after the first snow fall brings good luck.

              Bring in a vine from English ivy and tie a red ribbon on it will bring luck.

              Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

              For a lead role in a cage?

               

                                                          From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

                Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

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                Posted: October 3, 2011, 6:54 pm - IP Logged
                  rdgrnr's avatar - walt
                  Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
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                  Posted: October 9, 2011, 12:42 am - IP Logged

                  Collecting Acorns during the fall , will insure a wealthy , healthy winter.

                  Eating stewed tomatoes after the first snow fall brings good luck.

                  Bring in a vine from English ivy and tie a red ribbon on it will bring luck.

                  On the Fort Apache Rez they make Acorn Stew out of the Acorns and squirrel meat.

                  I ate a lot of Fry Bread there but not too much Acorn Stew.


                                                               
                                       
                                                           

                   

                   

                   

                   

                                                                                                                     

                  "The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing"

                                                                                                              --Edmund Burke

                   

                   

                    Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

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                    Posted: October 26, 2011, 2:09 pm - IP Logged

                    Emeril's Acorn Squash Soup

                    Recipe courtesy Emeril Lagasse

                    Team Planet Greenacorn squash soup photo

                    Planet Green

                    Ingredients:
                    3 acorn squash, halved, seed removed
                    3 tablespoons olive oil
                    2 carrots, chopped
                    1 Granny Smith apple, cored and chopped
                    1 onion, chopped
                    1/4 teaspoon ginger
                    1/8 teaspoon allspice
                    4 cups low sodium chicken stock or vegetable broth

                    Method: Preheat oven 400 degrees F.

                    On a baking sheet, roast the acorn squash, cut side down, until soft, about 45 minutes. Scoop out the squash flesh and set aside.

                    In a soup pot, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Saute carrot, apple, and onion until soft. Season with ginger and allspice. Add the squash and the chicken stock. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.

                    Remove the pot from the heat and puree with a hand-held immersion blender.

                    (Alternatively, in batches, puree in a blender or food processor and return to the pot.)

                    To Serve:
                    Remove from the heat and ladle the soup into bowls. Serve with warm bread if desired.

                    Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

                    ~~~

                    Pick 3

                    Method 1:  1-9-4
                    Method 2:  3-5-1
                    Method 3:  9-2-0
                    Method 4:  4-1-5
                    Method 5:  5-8-5
                    Method 6:  1-0-5

                     

                    Play 4

                    Method 1:  7-6-6-7
                    Method 2:  2-5-8-7
                    Method 3:  6-1-8-8
                    Method 4:  0-1-0-0
                    Method 5:  1-6-8-6
                    Method 6:  9-2-8-8

                    ~~~

                    Acorns (from oak trees) soup recipe coming next ...

                      Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

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                      Posted: November 2, 2011, 9:18 pm - IP Logged

                      ACORN SOUP

                      acorn soup

                      ...

                      Acorn soup is the first way I ever ate acorns. It was at a fancy restaurant in San Francisco called Incanto, and I was entranced that the chef, Chris Cosentino, could use acorns to make such a lovely soup. I never did get Chris’ recipe, but I came up with this one instead.

                      It is a smooth soup, deeply earthy and nutty from the combination of acorn “grits” — chopped up pieces that have had the bitter tannins removed — and porcini mushrooms. A dollop of creme fraiche, sour cream or even regular cream rounds everything out.

                      If you want to make this, you will need to know about collecting and eating acorns (google search) are just too weird for you but you want to make something similar, use chestnuts — even canned chestnuts make a good substitute.

                      Serves 4-6

                      • 3 cups acorn bits
                      • 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped
                      • 2 celery stalks, chopped
                      • 1 medium onion, chopped
                      • 4 tablespoons butter
                      • 2 ounces of dried porcini, soaked in 1 cup of hot water
                      • 2 bay leaves
                      • 1/4 cup pear or apple brandy
                      • 1 quart chicken, beef, mushroom or vegetable stock
                      • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
                      • Salt
                      • 1/2 cup creme fraiche or sour cream
                      • A few parsley leaves

                       

                      1. Soak the porcini in the hot water for an hour before starting.
                      2. Heat the butter in a soup pot over medium-high heat and saute the carrot, celery and onion for 3-4 minutes. add the mushrooms and acorn bits and stir to combine. Saute another 2 minutes or so.
                      3. Add the pear brandy and boil it hard until it is almost gone, then add the bay leaves, mushroom soaking water (make sure there’s no grit in it!) and the stock. Bring to a simmer, taste for salt and add if needed. Simmer gently, uncovered, for 1 hour.
                      4. Puree the soup in a blender (or use an immersion blender), then — if you want to get fancy — pass it through a fine-meshed sieve. If the soup is too thin, simmer it until you get a soup the consistency of melted ice cream.
                      5. To finish, turn off the heat and mix in the creme fraiche or sour cream. You can add just regular cream if you’d like, but I like the acidic twang of the sour cream. Garnish with the parsley.

                      Thanks ~ Hank Shaw

                       

                      Pick 3

                        9-9-6
                        5-0-2
                        7-1-0
                        0-2-4
                        1-8-3
                        3-9-3

                      Play 4

                       6-0-4-8
                       4-7-0-1
                       2-8-6-7
                       6-0-9-0
                       5-5-0-1
                       6-8-1-9

                      Don't eat acorns with holes in them! They have insects in them. 

                       

                        

                        Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

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                        Posted: November 2, 2011, 9:45 pm - IP Logged

                        North American Indian Recipes
                        "Acorn Recipes & Facts!" Acorn Recipes & Facts! ||
                        || Cherokee Favorites||


                        COOKING WITH ACORNS
                        From Redhawk


                        Pick 3

                        Method 1:  0-5-2
                        Method 2:  8-0-2
                        Method 3:  2-4-6
                        Method 4:  4-3-6
                        Method 5:  8-7-3
                        Method 6:  3-2-7

                         

                        ACORNS: A Major North American Indian Food

                        California Indians did not have to be farmers, and for the most part were hunters and gatherers. There was a ready supply of deer, fish, rabbits, foul, native plants for vegetables, native fruits, and even sea weed. Even so, acorns are said to have been the main food of as many as 3/4 of our native Californians. Acorns were everywhere, are easy to gather and store fairly well ... as long as your storage places are squirrel tight. Some groups buried baskets of nuts until they were needed. Some claim that white acorns were the most preferred because they were sweet and often eaten without leaching.

                        The most common oaks found in the San Francisco Bay area are the Tan Oak, Black Oak, California Live Oak, and Valley Oak. Many of these have been seriously endangered through the process of turning pasture land into housing developments, with the Live Oak being the least threatened -- since this oak is not deciduous, it offers "building development appeal" by remaining "green and healthy looking" all year.

                        Many of the Pomos prefer the Tan Oak because they feel it has more flavor. Many of the MiWuks prefer the Black Oak because it takes less leaching to get rid of the tannin. Many of us don't like the California live oak because "its too much work for the amount of meal you get compared to the amount of leaching you have to do," "its got no charachter," "too wormy," or "its too easy to get -- nothing that plentiful can be very good." The list goes on and on. My favorite is the Black Oak ... with a little Tan Oak added for character.

                        Acorns are gathered in the fall after they are ripe, Early in the season you will occasionally find acorns without their "little hats" lying on the ground. These are usually buggy. (If the acorn is so heavy that it pulls itself from its cap, it is usually because there is a worm flipping itself about inside the acorn, and all this activity is what breaks the nut free from its cap and the tree.) When the acorns are actually ripe, they fall from the tree, cap intact. If you see any holes in them, throw them away. They are sometimes stored first, to dry them out, and then shelled. Other groups shell them first, and then dry them out by placing them someplace safe, yet warm, to dry. For the ultimate in information on processing acorn, refer to a new book about Yosemite's Julia Parker, written by Park Naturalist Bev Ortiz which came out in 1992 or 1993. It was published by the same group that produces News from Native California, headed by Malcolm Margolin.

                        There is first and foremost, the original recipe: AFTER THE ACORNS ARE **COMPLETELY DRY** & REMOVED FROM THEIR SHELLS, the Acorns are ground until the meal is so fine that "it will stick to the basket sifter" when it is turned upside down. When you have determined that you have ground the acorns to "primo" consistency, you must then leach it. This was traditionally accomplished (before we had woven cloth to work with) by building a mound of fine sand, near a spring or the river, and then scooping out the center. The meal you wished to leach was placed in the center of this mound and water poured over a clean cedar bough which was placed or held above the acorn meal. The tannin would leach out of the acorn meal and harmlessly down into the sand. When tasting it showed the tannin had been removed, the meal was carefully removed from its sand "colander" and put into a cooking basket. Water is added -- the correct amount for the amount of acorn meal you are going to use, which is something that takes a while to adjust to. Too much water will require cooking longer to get the consistency you want. Not enough water and the acorn will burn. Then special cooking rocks were heated in a fire, rinsed off, and using special stirring sticks, the rocks were stirred in the basket to heat the acorn solution thoroughly. As each rock cooled down, it was removed, and another hot clean rock took its place in the cooking basket. The rock that had been removed was washed off and placed back in the fire to reheat and await its turn to become a cooking implement once again. In what seems like no time at all, the acorn soup is boiling, and the stirring continues until the soup is of the desired consistency -- either thin to eat with a spoon, or thicker to eat with a fork, depending on what the "cook" has in mind. Though the above "soup" was eaten straight by the traditional people, I usually add a little salt, and occasionally some dried currents or blue elderberries, or even raisins. Some people like to add a little cinnamon.

                        The rocks are saved for the next time, since finding perfect rocks that won't explode when subjected to heat, or won't crumble into the food, or give a bad taste, etc., are not as easy to find as you might think. The baskets, tools, implements, rocks, etc. used to cook acorn are considered a family legacy and kept within a family to be passed down from generation to generation. What makes a good cooking basket is the subject of another dissertation and shall not be gone into at this time. Ask the next expert basket weaver you meet to explain to you how a cooking basket is made.

                          

                        ALTERNATIVE LEACHING METHODS, & NATURAL DYING USES

                         Leaching Acorn Nutrition Information

                        The alternative method of leaching, which I personally use (as do most of the people I have spoken to about this subject) is to take my winnowing basket (or a broad-bottomed basket), place a clean, "white" UNBLEACHED cloth (like a tea towel used just for this purpose....which will never be white again) in the bottom of the basket, and then place your finely ground acorn meal on top of the cloth. Then I get a piece of cedar branch (new growth preferred and place it on top of the acorn meal and run water on it, VERY SLOWLY. I place my basket on top of a large cooking pot (so that I can save the tannin water) in such a way that when the pot fills up, my basket won't be sitting in the water, and the pot can overflow. I check on the leaching process periodically, so I can empty the soup kettle as it fills. Since I am also a weaver and spinner, who does natural dying on occasion, a day or two before I know I'm going to be leaching acorn, I wash any uncolored wool fleece I may have on hand that I will want to dye later, or any white yarn I want to dye in the near future...IF I REMEMBER. Sometimes I don't plan ahead. Anyway, as the acorn leaching pot fills, I will pour this tannin-filled water into the washing machine, where I later place up to 3 or 4 lbs of clean white wool or yarn to soak up the tannic acid solution. When I am ready to dye the wool at a later date, the color will come out much more dramatically that it would if I had used "untreated fleece".

                        Another way I have heard of to leach acorn, which I have NEVER tried and probably never will, is to SCRUB the water tank on your toilet to remove any algae, and use this "sanitary" part of your toilet to leach your acorn meal. It makes sense to use water that otherwise is wasted but it doesn't seem like a very aesthetic topic of conversation for a public gathering ... I can hear it now: "Gee, this acorn mush isn't half bad .... you must have leached it really thoroughly." "Why yes I do; I let it sit in a clean muslin bag in my toilet tank for a week or so..." Then watch your dinner guests put their food down, never to eat at your camp fire again. The girl that shared this bit of information with us had just remodeled her house, had a brand new toilet, and hence no green film in the tank, so she thought it was the perfect opportunity to try out a method she had heard of, or had a theory about. She also went on to say, that she was glad her new toilet was a pale brown color because the tannin discolored her the toilet bowl for quite some time....

                        Below is a recipe that I have used as recently as last year which is a good one to serve to those who stubbornly believe that acorn meal is yucky ... they'll never even know its there unless you tell them later -- and then they'll say things like "oh, that's why it was so bland," or "oh, that's why I didn't like it," or "that's why it got hungry an hour later." If you want to be sure you are actually tasting the meal, use the recipe exactly as is. Once you feel confident that you wish to include the meal, but you want to add more character to the stew, feel free to add garlic, green pepper, carrots, etc. The acorn then replaces the starch of the potato, and provides you with more nutrition than the potato would provide.

                        Play 4

                        Method 1:  7-8-6-3
                        Method 2:  4-2-4-2
                        Method 3:  0-8-4-5
                        Method 4:  7-5-1-9
                        Method 5:  6-4-5-5
                        Method 6:  7-4-1-7

                         


                        Traditional Venison Acorn Stew

                        To make venison stew, you will need the following:

                        2 lbs venison, cut up
                        1 Cup finely ground acorn meal

                        Cover venison with water in pot or basket; Add hot rocks to simmer until meat almost falls apart. Remove meat from broth and chop into fine pieces. Return to pot with liquid and stir in acorn meal. Serve hot.


                        Acorn Stew

                        To make stew, you will need the following:

                        1 lb stewing beef
                        1/2 C finely ground acorn meal (tannin removed)
                        Salt and pepper to taste

                        Place beef in heavy pan and add water to cover. Cover with lid and simmer until very tender. Remove from liquid and cut meat into very fine pieces. Return meat to the liquid. Stir in the acorn meal. Add salt and pepper as desired. Heat until thickened and serve.


                        Ethnic food enthusiasts like to substitute acorn meal for corn meal when making muffins -- usually using 1/2 corn meal and 1/2 acorn. Some have substituted 1/2 of the flour in a biscuit recipe with 1/2 acorn meal. Experiment carefully, remembering that a good portion of the work performed by flour has to do with the gluten in the floor. Acorn has no gluten, so you'll have to keep this in mind.

                        Here is a modern Acorn Bread recipe from the book "Cooking with Spirit, - North American Indian Food and Fact", by Darcy Williamson and Lisa Railsback Copyright 1987

                        Acorn Bread

                        To make bread, you will need the following:

                        6 Tbl. cornmeal
                        1/2 C cold water
                        1 C boiling water
                        1 tsp sale
                        1 Tbl butter
                        1 pkg active dry yeast
                        1/4 C lukewarm water
                        1 C mashed potatoes
                        2 C all-purpose flour
                        2 C finely ground leached acorn meal

                        Mix cornmeal with cold water, add boiling water and cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add sale and butter and cool to lukewarm. Soften yeast in lukewarm water. Add remaining ingredients to corn mixture, along with yeast. Knead to a stiff dough. Dough will be sticky. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk. Punch down, shape into two loaves, cover and let rise until doubled in bulk. Bake at 375 degrees F for 45 minutes.


                        Acorn Griddle Cakes

                        To make cakes, you will need the following:

                        2/3 C finely ground leached acorn meal
                        1/3 C unbleached flour
                        1 tsp. baking powder
                        1/3 tsp. salt
                        1 Tbl honey
                        1 egg, beaten
                        3/4 C milk
                        3 Tbl melted butter

                        Combine dry ingredients. Mix together egg and milk, then beat into dry ingredients, forming a smooth batter. Add butter. Drop batter onto hot, greased griddle. Bake, turning each cake when it is browned on underside and puffed and slightly set on top. Makes 12 to 15.

                        Thanks ~  Redhawk and thepeoplespaths net

                           

                          

                        Acorn Johnnycakes   Acorn Flatbread

                          sully16's avatar - sharan
                          Ringleader
                          Michigan
                          United States
                          Member #81740
                          October 28, 2009
                          40346 Posts
                          Online
                          Posted: November 13, 2011, 8:54 am - IP Logged

                          North American Indian Recipes
                          "Acorn Recipes & Facts!" Acorn Recipes & Facts! ||
                          || Cherokee Favorites||


                          COOKING WITH ACORNS
                          From Redhawk


                          Pick 3

                          Method 1:  0-5-2
                          Method 2:  8-0-2
                          Method 3:  2-4-6
                          Method 4:  4-3-6
                          Method 5:  8-7-3
                          Method 6:  3-2-7

                           

                          ACORNS: A Major North American Indian Food

                          California Indians did not have to be farmers, and for the most part were hunters and gatherers. There was a ready supply of deer, fish, rabbits, foul, native plants for vegetables, native fruits, and even sea weed. Even so, acorns are said to have been the main food of as many as 3/4 of our native Californians. Acorns were everywhere, are easy to gather and store fairly well ... as long as your storage places are squirrel tight. Some groups buried baskets of nuts until they were needed. Some claim that white acorns were the most preferred because they were sweet and often eaten without leaching.

                          The most common oaks found in the San Francisco Bay area are the Tan Oak, Black Oak, California Live Oak, and Valley Oak. Many of these have been seriously endangered through the process of turning pasture land into housing developments, with the Live Oak being the least threatened -- since this oak is not deciduous, it offers "building development appeal" by remaining "green and healthy looking" all year.

                          Many of the Pomos prefer the Tan Oak because they feel it has more flavor. Many of the MiWuks prefer the Black Oak because it takes less leaching to get rid of the tannin. Many of us don't like the California live oak because "its too much work for the amount of meal you get compared to the amount of leaching you have to do," "its got no charachter," "too wormy," or "its too easy to get -- nothing that plentiful can be very good." The list goes on and on. My favorite is the Black Oak ... with a little Tan Oak added for character.

                          Acorns are gathered in the fall after they are ripe, Early in the season you will occasionally find acorns without their "little hats" lying on the ground. These are usually buggy. (If the acorn is so heavy that it pulls itself from its cap, it is usually because there is a worm flipping itself about inside the acorn, and all this activity is what breaks the nut free from its cap and the tree.) When the acorns are actually ripe, they fall from the tree, cap intact. If you see any holes in them, throw them away. They are sometimes stored first, to dry them out, and then shelled. Other groups shell them first, and then dry them out by placing them someplace safe, yet warm, to dry. For the ultimate in information on processing acorn, refer to a new book about Yosemite's Julia Parker, written by Park Naturalist Bev Ortiz which came out in 1992 or 1993. It was published by the same group that produces News from Native California, headed by Malcolm Margolin.

                          There is first and foremost, the original recipe: AFTER THE ACORNS ARE **COMPLETELY DRY** & REMOVED FROM THEIR SHELLS, the Acorns are ground until the meal is so fine that "it will stick to the basket sifter" when it is turned upside down. When you have determined that you have ground the acorns to "primo" consistency, you must then leach it. This was traditionally accomplished (before we had woven cloth to work with) by building a mound of fine sand, near a spring or the river, and then scooping out the center. The meal you wished to leach was placed in the center of this mound and water poured over a clean cedar bough which was placed or held above the acorn meal. The tannin would leach out of the acorn meal and harmlessly down into the sand. When tasting it showed the tannin had been removed, the meal was carefully removed from its sand "colander" and put into a cooking basket. Water is added -- the correct amount for the amount of acorn meal you are going to use, which is something that takes a while to adjust to. Too much water will require cooking longer to get the consistency you want. Not enough water and the acorn will burn. Then special cooking rocks were heated in a fire, rinsed off, and using special stirring sticks, the rocks were stirred in the basket to heat the acorn solution thoroughly. As each rock cooled down, it was removed, and another hot clean rock took its place in the cooking basket. The rock that had been removed was washed off and placed back in the fire to reheat and await its turn to become a cooking implement once again. In what seems like no time at all, the acorn soup is boiling, and the stirring continues until the soup is of the desired consistency -- either thin to eat with a spoon, or thicker to eat with a fork, depending on what the "cook" has in mind. Though the above "soup" was eaten straight by the traditional people, I usually add a little salt, and occasionally some dried currents or blue elderberries, or even raisins. Some people like to add a little cinnamon.

                          The rocks are saved for the next time, since finding perfect rocks that won't explode when subjected to heat, or won't crumble into the food, or give a bad taste, etc., are not as easy to find as you might think. The baskets, tools, implements, rocks, etc. used to cook acorn are considered a family legacy and kept within a family to be passed down from generation to generation. What makes a good cooking basket is the subject of another dissertation and shall not be gone into at this time. Ask the next expert basket weaver you meet to explain to you how a cooking basket is made.

                            

                          ALTERNATIVE LEACHING METHODS, & NATURAL DYING USES

                           Leaching Acorn Nutrition Information

                          The alternative method of leaching, which I personally use (as do most of the people I have spoken to about this subject) is to take my winnowing basket (or a broad-bottomed basket), place a clean, "white" UNBLEACHED cloth (like a tea towel used just for this purpose....which will never be white again) in the bottom of the basket, and then place your finely ground acorn meal on top of the cloth. Then I get a piece of cedar branch (new growth preferred and place it on top of the acorn meal and run water on it, VERY SLOWLY. I place my basket on top of a large cooking pot (so that I can save the tannin water) in such a way that when the pot fills up, my basket won't be sitting in the water, and the pot can overflow. I check on the leaching process periodically, so I can empty the soup kettle as it fills. Since I am also a weaver and spinner, who does natural dying on occasion, a day or two before I know I'm going to be leaching acorn, I wash any uncolored wool fleece I may have on hand that I will want to dye later, or any white yarn I want to dye in the near future...IF I REMEMBER. Sometimes I don't plan ahead. Anyway, as the acorn leaching pot fills, I will pour this tannin-filled water into the washing machine, where I later place up to 3 or 4 lbs of clean white wool or yarn to soak up the tannic acid solution. When I am ready to dye the wool at a later date, the color will come out much more dramatically that it would if I had used "untreated fleece".

                          Another way I have heard of to leach acorn, which I have NEVER tried and probably never will, is to SCRUB the water tank on your toilet to remove any algae, and use this "sanitary" part of your toilet to leach your acorn meal. It makes sense to use water that otherwise is wasted but it doesn't seem like a very aesthetic topic of conversation for a public gathering ... I can hear it now: "Gee, this acorn mush isn't half bad .... you must have leached it really thoroughly." "Why yes I do; I let it sit in a clean muslin bag in my toilet tank for a week or so..." Then watch your dinner guests put their food down, never to eat at your camp fire again. The girl that shared this bit of information with us had just remodeled her house, had a brand new toilet, and hence no green film in the tank, so she thought it was the perfect opportunity to try out a method she had heard of, or had a theory about. She also went on to say, that she was glad her new toilet was a pale brown color because the tannin discolored her the toilet bowl for quite some time....

                          Below is a recipe that I have used as recently as last year which is a good one to serve to those who stubbornly believe that acorn meal is yucky ... they'll never even know its there unless you tell them later -- and then they'll say things like "oh, that's why it was so bland," or "oh, that's why I didn't like it," or "that's why it got hungry an hour later." If you want to be sure you are actually tasting the meal, use the recipe exactly as is. Once you feel confident that you wish to include the meal, but you want to add more character to the stew, feel free to add garlic, green pepper, carrots, etc. The acorn then replaces the starch of the potato, and provides you with more nutrition than the potato would provide.

                          Play 4

                          Method 1:  7-8-6-3
                          Method 2:  4-2-4-2
                          Method 3:  0-8-4-5
                          Method 4:  7-5-1-9
                          Method 5:  6-4-5-5
                          Method 6:  7-4-1-7

                           


                          Traditional Venison Acorn Stew

                          To make venison stew, you will need the following:

                          2 lbs venison, cut up
                          1 Cup finely ground acorn meal

                          Cover venison with water in pot or basket; Add hot rocks to simmer until meat almost falls apart. Remove meat from broth and chop into fine pieces. Return to pot with liquid and stir in acorn meal. Serve hot.


                          Acorn Stew

                          To make stew, you will need the following:

                          1 lb stewing beef
                          1/2 C finely ground acorn meal (tannin removed)
                          Salt and pepper to taste

                          Place beef in heavy pan and add water to cover. Cover with lid and simmer until very tender. Remove from liquid and cut meat into very fine pieces. Return meat to the liquid. Stir in the acorn meal. Add salt and pepper as desired. Heat until thickened and serve.


                          Ethnic food enthusiasts like to substitute acorn meal for corn meal when making muffins -- usually using 1/2 corn meal and 1/2 acorn. Some have substituted 1/2 of the flour in a biscuit recipe with 1/2 acorn meal. Experiment carefully, remembering that a good portion of the work performed by flour has to do with the gluten in the floor. Acorn has no gluten, so you'll have to keep this in mind.

                          Here is a modern Acorn Bread recipe from the book "Cooking with Spirit, - North American Indian Food and Fact", by Darcy Williamson and Lisa Railsback Copyright 1987

                          Acorn Bread

                          To make bread, you will need the following:

                          6 Tbl. cornmeal
                          1/2 C cold water
                          1 C boiling water
                          1 tsp sale
                          1 Tbl butter
                          1 pkg active dry yeast
                          1/4 C lukewarm water
                          1 C mashed potatoes
                          2 C all-purpose flour
                          2 C finely ground leached acorn meal

                          Mix cornmeal with cold water, add boiling water and cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add sale and butter and cool to lukewarm. Soften yeast in lukewarm water. Add remaining ingredients to corn mixture, along with yeast. Knead to a stiff dough. Dough will be sticky. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk. Punch down, shape into two loaves, cover and let rise until doubled in bulk. Bake at 375 degrees F for 45 minutes.


                          Acorn Griddle Cakes

                          To make cakes, you will need the following:

                          2/3 C finely ground leached acorn meal
                          1/3 C unbleached flour
                          1 tsp. baking powder
                          1/3 tsp. salt
                          1 Tbl honey
                          1 egg, beaten
                          3/4 C milk
                          3 Tbl melted butter

                          Combine dry ingredients. Mix together egg and milk, then beat into dry ingredients, forming a smooth batter. Add butter. Drop batter onto hot, greased griddle. Bake, turning each cake when it is browned on underside and puffed and slightly set on top. Makes 12 to 15.

                          Thanks ~  Redhawk and thepeoplespaths net

                             

                            

                          Acorn Johnnycakes   Acorn Flatbread

                          Thanks Harve$t, I have recipes for wild rice and the ever popular fry bread.

                          Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

                          For a lead role in a cage?

                           

                                                                      From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

                            sully16's avatar - sharan
                            Ringleader
                            Michigan
                            United States
                            Member #81740
                            October 28, 2009
                            40346 Posts
                            Online
                            Posted: December 7, 2011, 10:59 pm - IP Logged

                            Coming soon, some Christmas superstitions and lucky holiday charms.

                            Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

                            For a lead role in a cage?

                             

                                                                        From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

                              collegem$'s avatar - ts
                              Disney Land
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                              June 3, 2010
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                              Posted: December 8, 2011, 2:11 pm - IP Logged

                              LurkingHurray!HyperSmiley Santa

                              Thanks for all you do Sully16!!

                              Wear cute pajamas to bed...because you never know who you will meet in your dreams.

                                 
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