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Mathematics and the Lottery

649 replies. Last post 6 hours ago by wander73.

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Can a winning lottery system be created with existing math formulas?

Yes-It's all in the math books. [ 228 ]  [43.02%]
No-Anew math for will have to be created. [ 78 ]  [14.72%]
Math won't beat the lottery regularly. [ 224 ]  [42.26%]
Total Valid Votes [ 530 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 54 ]  

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CT
United States
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April 4, 2008
856 Posts
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Posted: February 26, 2013, 2:19 pm - IP Logged

You can easily build a scam by testing on the past results and presenting frequent events as system. Of course when the wind is changing direction, that system stops working.

You've hit the nail on the head?

Now take that and build a system.

Luck be with you!!!

NOTE: All numbers posted are BOXED and unless otherwise noted.

    SergeM's avatar - slow icon.png
    Economy class
    Belgium
    Member #123700
    February 27, 2012
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    Posted: February 26, 2013, 3:07 pm - IP Logged

    I am too busy, I can pick up again seriously in a few months. I have to focuss on other things.

      Tenaj's avatar - michellea
      Charlotte NC
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      Member #17406
      June 18, 2005
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      Posted: March 5, 2013, 12:36 am - IP Logged

      Pick 3 and Pick 4 lottery has its own math; unlike math as we know it.  It WRAPS and moves within its own realm.  When you go outside the realm, it's like trying to solve a simple first grade addition and subtraction problem with geometry or calulus, or something else complicated and way off track etc.  Proof - THE RUNDOWN!

      takeemtothebank

        Wabwabit's avatar - underground
        New Member
        Little Rock Arkansas
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        February 20, 2013
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        Posted: March 5, 2013, 8:32 pm - IP Logged

        I picked number three. Its logical to me that you won't win on a Regular basis with math alone, but it will give you an edge to make better choices.

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          Horwood NL
          Canada
          Member #70613
          February 6, 2009
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          Posted: March 18, 2013, 8:45 am - IP Logged

          I would say number 1. Since it is so hard to pick the winners with our formulas, we should be trying to pick the losers with our software and then play the numbers it doesn't pick. Reverse thinking might be the way to look at the lottery.

          It works most times when bringing up kids. lol

            Avatar
            Krypton
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            March 11, 2013
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            Posted: March 22, 2013, 8:06 am - IP Logged

            I do believe math can win the lotto and no I donot have proof, I wish I did.  When I come up with something I will share freely Party

              JKING's avatar - Kaleidoscope 3.gif

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              Posted: April 9, 2013, 8:59 am - IP Logged

              FYI,

              http://plus.maths.org/content/understanding-uncertainty-visualising-probabilities

              You are a slave to the choices you have made.  jk

              Even a blind squirrel will occasioanlly find an acorn.

                JKING's avatar - Kaleidoscope 3.gif

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                Posted: April 10, 2013, 12:01 am - IP Logged

                A little more about visualization techniques. 

                http://www.sciencemag.org/content/333/6048/1393.full?ijkey=Acpy7mOfhOfx.&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

                You are a slave to the choices you have made.  jk

                Even a blind squirrel will occasioanlly find an acorn.

                  JKING's avatar - Kaleidoscope 3.gif

                  United States
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                  Posted: April 22, 2013, 5:12 pm - IP Logged

                  FYI,

                  http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-memory-winner.html

                  You are a slave to the choices you have made.  jk

                  Even a blind squirrel will occasioanlly find an acorn.

                    JKING's avatar - Kaleidoscope 3.gif

                    United States
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                    Posted: April 23, 2013, 11:05 pm - IP Logged

                    Game theory...a little history

                    http://phys.org/news/2013-04-pride-prejudice-strategic-jane-austen.html

                    You are a slave to the choices you have made.  jk

                    Even a blind squirrel will occasioanlly find an acorn.

                      msharkey2001's avatar - Trek startrek.gif
                      New Hampshire
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                      December 12, 2012
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                      Posted: May 13, 2013, 7:56 pm - IP Logged

                      Hi players I have a powerball related math question. Can someone tell me how I would set up a formula to determine how many of the possible 5.1 million or so white ball combinations contain numbers that are all at least 5 numbers away from any other given number in that line. For example 1-6-11-16-21, 1-6-11-16-22, 2-7-12-17-22, and so on and so forth. Would appreciate any input!

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                        Member #130795
                        July 25, 2012
                        80 Posts
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                        Posted: May 14, 2013, 2:20 am - IP Logged

                        Hi players I have a powerball related math question. Can someone tell me how I would set up a formula to determine how many of the possible 5.1 million or so white ball combinations contain numbers that are all at least 5 numbers away from any other given number in that line. For example 1-6-11-16-21, 1-6-11-16-22, 2-7-12-17-22, and so on and so forth. Would appreciate any input!

                        I cannot offer a math formula.  But I can offer an algorithm, implemented in Excel VBA below.

                        But first, it might be useful to clear up a misunderstanding.   The number of combinations -- COMBIN(59,5) -- is 5,006,386, about 5.01 million.  I don't know if your "5.1 million or so" is a typo, or if you misunderstand how the odds are computed.  The odds (probability) of matching 5, but not the powerball is about 1 in 5,153,632.65 because it is 34 in 175,223,510.  That is, 1 in 35*COMBIN(59,5) / 34.

                        So the answer to your question is 962,598 of 5,006,386 combinations, about 19.23%.

                        That can be computed efficiently by the following Excel VBA code.  It runs in less than 0.03 sec on my (ancient) computer.

                        Sub doit()
                        Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                        Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                        Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                        Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                        nc = WorksheetFunction.Combin(nNum, 5)
                        n = 0
                        For i1 = 1 To nNum - 20
                              For i2 = i1 + 5 To nNum - 15
                              For i3 = i2 + 5 To nNum - 10
                              For i4 = i3 + 5 To nNum - 5
                              For i5 = i4 + 5 To nNum
                                  n = n + 1
                        Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                        MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                              Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                              Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                        End Sub

                        If you do not trust that implementation, the following less-efficient algorithm exhaustively generates all COMBIN(59,5) combinations and counts those that meet your requirements.  It runs in less than 0.8 sec on my computer.

                        Sub doit2()
                        Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                        Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                        Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                        Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                        n = 0: nc = 0
                        For i1 = 1 To nNum - 4
                              For i2 = i1 + 1 To nNum - 3
                              For i3 = i2 + 1 To nNum - 2
                              For i4 = i3 + 1 To nNum - 1
                              For i5 = i4 + 1 To nNum
                                  nc = nc + 1
                                  If i5 >= i4 + 5 And i4 >= i3 + 5 And _
                                      i3 >= i2 + 5 And i2 >= i1 + 5 Then n = n + 1
                        Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                        MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                              Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                              Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                        End Sub

                          msharkey2001's avatar - Trek startrek.gif
                          New Hampshire
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                          December 12, 2012
                          322 Posts
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                          Posted: May 14, 2013, 6:03 am - IP Logged

                          I cannot offer a math formula.  But I can offer an algorithm, implemented in Excel VBA below.

                          But first, it might be useful to clear up a misunderstanding.   The number of combinations -- COMBIN(59,5) -- is 5,006,386, about 5.01 million.  I don't know if your "5.1 million or so" is a typo, or if you misunderstand how the odds are computed.  The odds (probability) of matching 5, but not the powerball is about 1 in 5,153,632.65 because it is 34 in 175,223,510.  That is, 1 in 35*COMBIN(59,5) / 34.

                          So the answer to your question is 962,598 of 5,006,386 combinations, about 19.23%.

                          That can be computed efficiently by the following Excel VBA code.  It runs in less than 0.03 sec on my (ancient) computer.

                          Sub doit()
                          Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                          Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                          Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                          Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                          nc = WorksheetFunction.Combin(nNum, 5)
                          n = 0
                          For i1 = 1 To nNum - 20
                                For i2 = i1 + 5 To nNum - 15
                                For i3 = i2 + 5 To nNum - 10
                                For i4 = i3 + 5 To nNum - 5
                                For i5 = i4 + 5 To nNum
                                    n = n + 1
                          Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                          MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                                Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                                Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                          End Sub

                          If you do not trust that implementation, the following less-efficient algorithm exhaustively generates all COMBIN(59,5) combinations and counts those that meet your requirements.  It runs in less than 0.8 sec on my computer.

                          Sub doit2()
                          Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                          Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                          Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                          Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                          n = 0: nc = 0
                          For i1 = 1 To nNum - 4
                                For i2 = i1 + 1 To nNum - 3
                                For i3 = i2 + 1 To nNum - 2
                                For i4 = i3 + 1 To nNum - 1
                                For i5 = i4 + 1 To nNum
                                    nc = nc + 1
                                    If i5 >= i4 + 5 And i4 >= i3 + 5 And _
                                        i3 >= i2 + 5 And i2 >= i1 + 5 Then n = n + 1
                          Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                          MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                                Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                                Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                          End Sub

                          Thanks mathhead for taking the time to do this. Very much appreciated on my part. Good luck to you on tomorrows drawing!

                            Avatar

                            United States
                            Member #130795
                            July 25, 2012
                            80 Posts
                            Offline
                            Posted: May 14, 2013, 11:08 am - IP Logged

                            I cannot offer a math formula.  But I can offer an algorithm, implemented in Excel VBA below.

                            But first, it might be useful to clear up a misunderstanding.   The number of combinations -- COMBIN(59,5) -- is 5,006,386, about 5.01 million.  I don't know if your "5.1 million or so" is a typo, or if you misunderstand how the odds are computed.  The odds (probability) of matching 5, but not the powerball is about 1 in 5,153,632.65 because it is 34 in 175,223,510.  That is, 1 in 35*COMBIN(59,5) / 34.

                            So the answer to your question is 962,598 of 5,006,386 combinations, about 19.23%.

                            That can be computed efficiently by the following Excel VBA code.  It runs in less than 0.03 sec on my (ancient) computer.

                            Sub doit()
                            Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                            Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                            Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                            Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                            nc = WorksheetFunction.Combin(nNum, 5)
                            n = 0
                            For i1 = 1 To nNum - 20
                                  For i2 = i1 + 5 To nNum - 15
                                  For i3 = i2 + 5 To nNum - 10
                                  For i4 = i3 + 5 To nNum - 5
                                  For i5 = i4 + 5 To nNum
                                      n = n + 1
                            Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                            MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                                  Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                                  Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                            End Sub

                            If you do not trust that implementation, the following less-efficient algorithm exhaustively generates all COMBIN(59,5) combinations and counts those that meet your requirements.  It runs in less than 0.8 sec on my computer.

                            Sub doit2()
                            Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                            Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                            Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                            Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                            n = 0: nc = 0
                            For i1 = 1 To nNum - 4
                                  For i2 = i1 + 1 To nNum - 3
                                  For i3 = i2 + 1 To nNum - 2
                                  For i4 = i3 + 1 To nNum - 1
                                  For i5 = i4 + 1 To nNum
                                      nc = nc + 1
                                      If i5 >= i4 + 5 And i4 >= i3 + 5 And _
                                          i3 >= i2 + 5 And i2 >= i1 + 5 Then n = n + 1
                            Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                            MsgBox Format(n, "#,##0") & " / " & _
                                  Format(nc, "#,##0") & "    " & _
                                  Format(n / nc, "0.0000%")
                            End Sub

                            A VBA function might be more useful.  See below.  You can call it as =gap5Combo() to get just the single count (962,598).  Or you can select a range of up to 3 horizontal cells and array-enter the same formula (press ctrl+shift+Enter) to get up to 3 values:  the count of qualifying combos (962,598), the count of all possible combos (5,006,386), and the fraction of qualifying combos (about 0.1923), which you can format as Percentage.  You can also select a range of up to 3 vertical cells and array-enter the formula =TRANSPOSE(gap5Combo()).

                            Function gap5Combo() As Variant
                            ' number of combinations where each number
                            ' is 5 or more from any other number
                            Const nNum As Long = 59    ' Powerball
                            Dim i1 As Long, i2 As Long, i3 As Long
                            Dim i4 As Long, i5 As Long
                            Dim n As Long, nc As Long
                            nc = WorksheetFunction.Combin(nNum, 5)
                            n = 0
                            For i1 = 1 To nNum - 20
                                For i2 = i1 + 5 To nNum - 15
                                For i3 = i2 + 5 To nNum - 10
                                For i4 = i3 + 5 To nNum - 5
                                For i5 = i4 + 5 To nNum
                                    n = n + 1
                            Next i5, i4, i3, i2, i1
                            gap5Combo = Array(n, nc, n / nc)
                            End Function


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                              Posted: May 14, 2013, 11:13 am - IP Logged

                              Thanks mathhead for taking the time to do this. Very much appreciated on my part. Good luck to you on tomorrows drawing!

                              I Agree! You guys are awesome. Keep up the great work.

                                 
                                Page 23 of 44