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It's time the lottery needs to stop releasing a person name and picture when a big win is won!

Topic closed. 128 replies. Last post 2 years ago by Stack47.

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Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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Posted: February 19, 2015, 12:25 am - IP Logged

I think all states should pass a law making anonymity an available option. Winners can remain anonymous in South Carolina, and thus far there have been no known cases of fraud associated with that option.

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    NY
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    Posted: February 20, 2015, 3:12 am - IP Logged

    I think all states should pass a law making anonymity an available option. Winners can remain anonymous in South Carolina, and thus far there have been no known cases of fraud associated with that option.

    How would you even know if the lottery committed fraud, if the only information they're required to release is "yeah, somebody won"?

      Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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      Posted: February 20, 2015, 5:42 pm - IP Logged

      How would you even know if the lottery committed fraud, if the only information they're required to release is "yeah, somebody won"?

      The paranoid fear of lottery fraud doesn't trump a winner's right to privacy and personal safety. There are documented cases around the country of winners being robbed and even murdered by strangers and acquaintances - who got the winner's personal info from TV, newspapers, websites etcetera.

      Not to mention that in the internet age, criminals can access a substantial amount of sensitive information about a person by simply googling their name and county of residence. This can and frequently does lead to such things as identity theft, which can cost victims tens of thousands of dollars to repair the damage done.

      Paranoid fears of lottery fraud don't negate a winner's right to protect themselves from such things as identity theft, burglary, robbery and murder. Many people and politicians around the country agree with my commonsense view, which is why Texas and other states are currently considering legislation to give winners the privacy option.

      Please remember that this type of legislation would only give winners the OPTION of privacy, not require it. So any individuals of questionable commonsense could still opt to let the whole nation know they just won a major lottery jackpot. If some people want to paint a target on their back like that, I say let them. But don't force me to do something stupid that could endanger me and my loved ones.

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        Romancandle's avatar - moon
        Upacreek
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        Posted: February 20, 2015, 7:33 pm - IP Logged

        The interesting thing in this thread is those that want anonymity are viewed as paranoid and those that are against it are viewed as paranoid LOL

        -RC

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          Kentucky
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          Posted: February 20, 2015, 9:24 pm - IP Logged

          The paranoid fear of lottery fraud doesn't trump a winner's right to privacy and personal safety. There are documented cases around the country of winners being robbed and even murdered by strangers and acquaintances - who got the winner's personal info from TV, newspapers, websites etcetera.

          Not to mention that in the internet age, criminals can access a substantial amount of sensitive information about a person by simply googling their name and county of residence. This can and frequently does lead to such things as identity theft, which can cost victims tens of thousands of dollars to repair the damage done.

          Paranoid fears of lottery fraud don't negate a winner's right to protect themselves from such things as identity theft, burglary, robbery and murder. Many people and politicians around the country agree with my commonsense view, which is why Texas and other states are currently considering legislation to give winners the privacy option.

          Please remember that this type of legislation would only give winners the OPTION of privacy, not require it. So any individuals of questionable commonsense could still opt to let the whole nation know they just won a major lottery jackpot. If some people want to paint a target on their back like that, I say let them. But don't force me to do something stupid that could endanger me and my loved ones.

          "The paranoid fear of lottery fraud doesn't trump a winner's right to privacy and personal safety."

          Allowing winners to remain anonymous means the state lottery will not publish the name and address of winners, but because the lotteries are public entities, the information may still available through the state's public service laws. The Freedom of Information Act only applies to the Federal Government. Most lotteries share the information with other state agencies like courts, departments of taxation and there will be a large money transaction into the winner's account all of which makes total anonymity difficult at best.

          Does your lottery winner's right apply to birth, deaths, marriages, real estate transfers, court reports, and other public transaction?

            Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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            Posted: February 20, 2015, 10:29 pm - IP Logged

            Lottery anonymity/privacy laws only forbid lottery entities from releasing personal information about you to the PUBLIC and the News Media etcetera, NOT government entities. Big Brother will always have access to virtually everything they want to know about you. "Total" anonymity is not and never was the goal of these laws. They simply state that lottery entities cannot release your name, address, photo and other personal info to the previously listed sources without your permission.

            An 86-year old man was recently murdered in Detroit shortly after knowledge of his lottery win went public. Intellect and commonsense tell me that having your name, address, photo and other personal info plastered all over TV, newspapers, websites etcetera - after you've won a big lottery prize - is very unwise.

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              mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
              Texas Panhandle
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              Posted: February 20, 2015, 10:59 pm - IP Logged

              There have been several new posts in this thread since I jotted the following down on a Notepad document.  Instead of addressing/quoting each post I wanted to reply to, this will do instead.



              As I commented about earlier in this thread, I did a search for "lottery winners killed" and found only a few cases. The most publicized case was Abraham Shakespeare, killed by a friend and roommate, Jeffrey Dampier, killed by his sister-in-law and her boyfriend and Urooj Khan, whose death was initially ruled from natural causes, but tests later showed he had a lethal amount of cyanide in his body. The investigation is still ongoing, but my money is on his widow (who prepared the last meal he ate) being the culprit. I also think that, since Khan was a successful businessman with multiple holdings, the lottery win was just the icing on the cake, perhaps the impetus for the (alleged) murder, but not totally to blame.

              If you want to argue that "strangers" have indeed killed lottery winners, I'll tentatively stipulate to the case of Arthur Neal, the elderly Detroit man who went missing after being thought to have won $20k and was later found stabbed to death, then you would also have to admit that's a place where people have been killed for their Air Jordan sneakers. (or over drugs or for wearing the wrong colors or for much lesser amounts of money or for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time) There's something peculiar about that particular case, in that it was Neal's family who said he had won the lottery, but the Michigan Lottery says no winning ticket was ever cashed.  Mike Payne, who described himself as Neal’s best friend, said he hadn’t heard of any lottery winnings. “I spent every day with him, and I would think he’d have told me,” said Payne, 65, who worked construction jobs with Neal. Payne described Neal as a “nice guy who also made some enemies. He was kind of strange; he used to hide cash in his house, but it wouldn’t be in places you’d think. He’d have money in the trash can, or in the barbecue grill. He was an interesting character.” (source) So, there's no proof he was killed because he was a lottery winner, nor has there been any proof he WAS a lottery winner.

              I will admit there's definitely been one murder for lottery winnings by a stranger, the Graeme Thorne kidnapping and subsequent murder in Australia, a half-century ago and a half-world away. While tragic, it was a case where some "common sense" used could have prevented it...and that same "common sense" will go a long way towards protecting you, be it after a lottery win or with preventing identity theft. (which is nothing more than a red herring in regards to this discussion on lottery winners being murdered)

              So, there's a few cases of lottery winners being murdered for their winnings and the results show it's a very rare thing indeed and that you're much more likely to be murdered by family or friends after you win the lottery than by a stranger. Govt. fraud and corruption, on the other hand, is well documented and in no way can be attributed to paranoid thinking. We need to have transparency whenever the government is involved...that is, unless you're in favor of a nanny state and are mind-boggling naive enough to believe everything the govt. tells you.

                Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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                Posted: February 20, 2015, 11:30 pm - IP Logged

                Not only have many lottery winners been murdered by strangers, people they barely knew in their communities etcetera - but you also have to take into account the many other serious crimes committed against them - such as armed robberies, burglaries, kidnappings, stalkings etcetera. Not to mention less serious things like being constantly harassed by people they don't even know walking up and begging them for money. All of these things have been thoroughly documented in this country for decades.

                The courts have upheld lottery privacy laws, and more states are wisely considering adopting these laws. If your state has a lottery privacy law and you're afraid the big, bad lottery or "gubbermint" is going to cheat you, then you're certainly free not to play the lottery. Move to a state where they paint a target on your back by letting all the criminals know you just hit the jackpot and are now rich.

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                  mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
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                  Posted: February 20, 2015, 11:33 pm - IP Logged

                  "Not only have many lottery winners been murdered by strangers..."

                  Name them.  Verifiable sources only, please, not pulled out of your hat or some dark orifice as you seem prone to do.   I'll wait.

                  I'll counter your argument about not playing with another that's already been mentioned:  if you're too stupid to know how to protect yourself after winning a JP, don't play.

                    mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
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                    Posted: February 20, 2015, 11:41 pm - IP Logged

                    Oh, and I forgot this - you said it in another thread, too, but I looked and found one where the courts had ruled for and another where they had ruled against:

                    "The courts have upheld lottery privacy laws..."

                    There was this case Stone Street Capital, Inc. v. Bureau of State Lottery where one of those companies who buy lottery annuities wanted the information released to them.  They lost their case, but it's interesting reading.  Here's an article posted in here from a few yrs. ago about another court case that went the other way: Judge rules Washington lottery winners can't be anonymous   It's not very honest of you to make those statements when they're not completely true.

                    You make all these specious statements as facts, but when I research them,  I can't find anything to validate them.  You are, as we say here in Texas "All hat, no cattle."

                      mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
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                      Posted: February 21, 2015, 12:36 am - IP Logged

                      "Not only have many lottery winners been murdered by strangers..."

                      Name them.  Verifiable sources only, please, not pulled out of your hat or some dark orifice as you seem prone to do.   I'll wait.

                      I'll counter your argument about not playing with another that's already been mentioned:  if you're too stupid to know how to protect yourself after winning a JP, don't play.

                      Too stupid to NOT know...

                      Banged that out a little fast, will admit to being angry at being insulted like I was some Alex Jones follower.

                        Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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                        Posted: February 21, 2015, 12:44 am - IP Logged

                        Regarding the LP article entitled "Judge rules Washington lottery winners can't be anonymous":

                        1. In this thread, we're clearly talking about STATE LAWS regarding lottery privacy/anonymity - state laws being defined as laws passed by a STATE LEGISLATURE.
                        2. An intelligent examination of the LP article about the Washington case, reveals that NO state lottery privacy law was overturned by the judge, since there was no such law on the books there.
                        3. ALL the Judge's decision did was overturn a TEMPORARY INJUNCTION issued by a lower court official, which is NOT a state law passed by a state legislature. The temporary injunction had only applied to ONE COUPLE that had originally requested it from the lower court official.

                        So my original claim still stands tall and true - State lottery privacy laws passed by state legislatures have been upheld by the courts. Crying shame some here at LP don't know the difference between a state law passed by the state legislature and a temporary court injunction granted by a court official.

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                          Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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                          Posted: February 21, 2015, 1:24 am - IP Logged

                          More bad news for the folks who oppose state lottery privacy laws. Besides the half dozen states that have privacy laws on the books, there are a number of other states where winners can remain anonymous by establishing a TRUST. One of the states that already allows winners to remain anonymous via trust, just happens to be TEXAS:

                          http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Trust-keeps-24-million-jackpot-winner-anonymous-3848371.php

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                            Posted: February 21, 2015, 1:31 am - IP Logged

                            1. "Some" of us are clearly talking and making cogent arguments;  "others" are making up stuff as they go along. 

                            2.  "Intelligent"? Lets you out or at the very least brings into question your reading comprehension.   You should read it again, the court upheld the Washington state policy in regards to not allowing anonymous claims.   I don't know Washington state laws about privacy, only this:

                            From the Washington's Lottery website:

                            As a public agency, all documents held by Washington's Lottery are subject to the Public Records Act. Lottery prizes may be claimed in the name of a legally formed entity, such as a trust. However, in the event of a public records request, the documents forming the artificial entity may be released, thereby revealing the individual names of winners.

                            3. So what?  The ruling stood.  At least I found an example where the courts upheld the state's requirement that lottery winner's names must be released. To my credit, I also included another case where a court ruled differently.  That's much, much more than you've done;  all you've done is thrown out statements that you refuse to verify or can't.   You've thrown up so many strawmen in your specious arguments that I'm starting to get allergies.

                            While we're on the subject of state's rights, it doesn't bother me one bit about how another state handles anonymity, that's their business and doesn't affect me one bit.  You want it in N. Carolina?  I suggest you quit whining on forums and petition your state legislators.   When we're talking Texas, you're certainly allowed to have an opinion, but should also realize it means absolutely nothing as to how this state handles anonymity, it's none of your business.

                            In regards to your last post: Trust information is public information and can be obtained from the Secretary of State. One can find out who the Trustees are & an address as well as managing partners & president for LLC's. The Texas Lottery has to provide claim forms and copies of papers submitted by the winners if requested through Open Records. You may not know who the winner actually is but you will be able to contact someone who does know.

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                              Posted: February 21, 2015, 1:58 am - IP Logged

                              My original claim was that the courts have upheld STATE LAWS passed by STATE LEGISLATURES that ensure privacy/anonymity for lottery winners. Washington has NEVER had such a law on the books, so you can't overturn a law that NEVER existed.

                              It was merely a TEMPORARY COURT INJUNCTION involving TWO people that was overturned. I never made any claims regarding temporary injunctions, so your argument is bogus.

                              A state law passed by the state legislature and a temporary court injunction by a lower court official are two entirely different critters.

                              So you're comparing apples and oranges, and my claim still stands true and correct regarding the STATE LOTTERY PRIVACY LAWS that have been upheld by the courts.

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