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It's time the lottery needs to stop releasing a person name and picture when a big win is won!

Topic closed. 128 replies. Last post 2 years ago by Stack47.

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mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
Texas Panhandle
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December 20, 2012
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Posted: February 21, 2015, 2:01 am - IP Logged

You're splitting hairs and obfuscating.  Tell me, what are the Washington state lottery privacy laws?  Whatever they are, apparently the lottery policy doesn't conflict with them.

    Scratch$'s avatar - sm lottery.jpg

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    Posted: February 21, 2015, 2:25 am - IP Logged

    The entity MANAGING a trust is public information, but the identity of the individual the trust was established for is NOT. That information can usually only be obtained via court order. If the entity managing the trust leaked a client's name to an unauthorized person or source, they could be sued big time.

    If you had bothered to read the Houston Chronicle article I linked to, you'd know that none of the lottery winners that had established trusts had been identified yet. I couldn't care less if some schmuck knows who's running my trust, as long as they don't know who I am. Good enough privacy for me!

    Scratchers ~ Cash 5 ~ Powerball ~ Mega Millions

      mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
      Texas Panhandle
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      Posted: February 21, 2015, 2:40 am - IP Logged

      I read that article shortly after it was published.  Well, then that blows the water out of every argument that Texas doesn't allow for anonymous claiming then, huh?   Not sure on the particulars, but I believe  there is another lottery winner that's done the same here.  That's what you should do if you ever win the lottery in Texas.  Me?  I'm saving my money and investing instead in a little sidearm security if I feel threatened.  I'll also get a new phone number and will move, not simply because I'll be worried about my safety, but because I'll be rich and want to do those things anyway.

      As I've proved several times, claiming anonymously doesn't guarantee someone's safety since it's nearly always been a friend or family member killing the lottery winner.  You can't keep winning the lottery a secret from friends and family, at least not for very long. The chance of a secret being kept is inversely proportional to the square of the number of people who know it.

      I'm still waiting on you for that list of lottery winners killed by strangers.  Oh wait, I already posted it.   I guess you didn't read it since it wasn't in the Houston Chronicle.  (although I write much better than those progressive hacks and my facts are researched)

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        Posted: February 21, 2015, 3:41 am - IP Logged

        Pretty sure you can wear a disguise when you have your picture taken in any State.

        That sounds like a good idea.  Wear that white make-up all over your face and neck (like the Mimes do);  Darken the area around the mouth with a smile or frown covering a larger area that your real mouth; wear a pair of Groucho Marx glasses and big nose; wear a wig;  place a pillow under your shirt to make you look fat.  Let your lawyer do all the talking, you keep silent.  When asked a question directly by the media during the interview give them the middle-finger and smile...lol....or hold up a sign that reads "Buzz Off".

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          Krypton
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          Posted: February 21, 2015, 5:39 am - IP Logged

          I read that article shortly after it was published.  Well, then that blows the water out of every argument that Texas doesn't allow for anonymous claiming then, huh?   Not sure on the particulars, but I believe  there is another lottery winner that's done the same here.  That's what you should do if you ever win the lottery in Texas.  Me?  I'm saving my money and investing instead in a little sidearm security if I feel threatened.  I'll also get a new phone number and will move, not simply because I'll be worried about my safety, but because I'll be rich and want to do those things anyway.

          As I've proved several times, claiming anonymously doesn't guarantee someone's safety since it's nearly always been a friend or family member killing the lottery winner.  You can't keep winning the lottery a secret from friends and family, at least not for very long. The chance of a secret being kept is inversely proportional to the square of the number of people who know it.

          I'm still waiting on you for that list of lottery winners killed by strangers.  Oh wait, I already posted it.   I guess you didn't read it since it wasn't in the Houston Chronicle.  (although I write much better than those progressive hacks and my facts are researched)

          You can ask to remain anonymous for one year  after that you can Consider forming a blind trust with your attorney. This will let you collect the money while maintaining your anonymity. You will be able to designate the power of attorney, and your attorney will help you iron out any other wrinkle you may encounter in the arrangement. This is what I've done!

          Take taxes into consideration. Two things are certain in life: Death and taxes. Well, you probably don't have to worry about death just quite yet, unless the shock of the prize has your heart feeling a little fluttery. But, yes, there will be taxes. You may get double taxed on your win, first when you receive it but also if it moves your tax rate higher you will get a further tax demand at the end of the tax year.  Greedy Bas.....

          All lottery winnings are considered taxable income in the United States, regardless of whether they are received as a lump sum or in multiple annual payments.
          Holding the lottery winnings in a trust has some tax advantages because it avoids probate of the lottery proceeds upon death of the winner and minimizes taxes on the estate.
          Translation: trusts don't get taxed as much, so consider setting one up!

          Just my 2c

          Stay In The Vortex, you'll be happy you did ..... Random? Seriously? You want me to believe that?

            mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
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            Posted: February 21, 2015, 6:03 am - IP Logged

            I never have seen anything about asking to remain anonymous in Texas, but I'll be the first to admit I don't know everything about doing that.  I never have seen anything on the Texas Lottery site, though.

            I don't like being accused of being paranoid about govt. hijinks, but I couldn't deny being more than a little where shysters lawyers are concerned.  I don't feel as though I'd be comfortable with giving one the power over my new-found fortune. 

            I've said it before, but will repeat:  I'm not against a period of anonymity, somewhere between 90-180 days would be more than enough,  IMHO.

            I appreciated the advice, though and thanks f/ the reply.

              Romancandle's avatar - moon
              Upacreek
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              Posted: February 21, 2015, 11:28 am - IP Logged

              Who signs the back of the lottery ticket when a trust claims the ticket?  Always wondered about that...

              -RC

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                Zeta Reticuli Star System
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                Posted: February 21, 2015, 2:39 pm - IP Logged

                From FreeAdvice.com:

                No, trusts are private entities and their terms and composition are not normally a matter of public record. Similarly, powers of attorney are not public records. In some cases, where business is transacted by a trust or person acting under a POA, there is a trace, such as signatures on bank records, stock and brokerage firm records, deeds, etc. that show who the people acting are.

                Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                Lep

                There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

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                  Kentucky
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                  Posted: February 21, 2015, 4:22 pm - IP Logged

                  From FreeAdvice.com:

                  No, trusts are private entities and their terms and composition are not normally a matter of public record. Similarly, powers of attorney are not public records. In some cases, where business is transacted by a trust or person acting under a POA, there is a trace, such as signatures on bank records, stock and brokerage firm records, deeds, etc. that show who the people acting are.

                  If the actual winner owed back child or spousal support, taxes, court ordered restitution, costs, or fines, will a trust protect them from that?

                    veganlife125's avatar - Lottery-061.jpg

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                    Posted: February 21, 2015, 8:32 pm - IP Logged

                    If the actual winner owed back child or spousal support, taxes, court ordered restitution, costs, or fines, will a trust protect them from that?

                    Will a trust protect jackpot winning "galoot's" from "the talk" voters who support wanton lifestyles paid for by someone else and enforced with guns and badges?

                    I rephrased it for you for better communication to the community since some prefer it more honest and open.Wink

                    Don't forget to visit the Lottery Post Gift Shop!

                      addai1516's avatar - lib
                      Newyork City NY / westland michigan
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                      Posted: February 22, 2015, 12:10 pm - IP Logged

                      Privacy is priceless most important gift anyone one can receive !!

                      < God bless all  ,family, love, happiness > 

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                        Kentucky
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                        Posted: February 22, 2015, 9:50 pm - IP Logged

                        Will a trust protect jackpot winning "galoot's" from "the talk" voters who support wanton lifestyles paid for by someone else and enforced with guns and badges?

                        I rephrased it for you for better communication to the community since some prefer it more honest and open.Wink

                        I asked because of the "Oath" Ohio player are required to take when claiming prizes over $600.

                        OATH. If the prize amount claimed is $600 or greater I further affirm under oath the following: I am / am not (circle one) in default of an administrative or court order in Ohio requiring the payment of child or spousal support (Knowingly making a false affirmation regarding default under a child or spousal support order is a criminal offense under Revised Code section 3770.99(B)).

                        Never thought about creating a trust to claim $5000 winners, but I never had any court ordered payments either. Do you think the people are demanding anonymity because they have something to hide?

                          Saylorgirl's avatar - Lottery-065.jpg
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                          Posted: February 23, 2015, 7:31 am - IP Logged

                          I asked because of the "Oath" Ohio player are required to take when claiming prizes over $600.

                          OATH. If the prize amount claimed is $600 or greater I further affirm under oath the following: I am / am not (circle one) in default of an administrative or court order in Ohio requiring the payment of child or spousal support (Knowingly making a false affirmation regarding default under a child or spousal support order is a criminal offense under Revised Code section 3770.99(B)).

                          Never thought about creating a trust to claim $5000 winners, but I never had any court ordered payments either. Do you think the people are demanding anonymity because they have something to hide?

                          I am under the impression at least here in Indiana you can claim in a trust and the trustee can appear at the press conference to collect the big check.  However, the lottery still has to know your identity and will process the claim in the normal channels.  So I don't think you can hid your child support or judgements, etc.  This is just my opinion and I could be wrong.

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                            Kentucky
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                            Posted: February 23, 2015, 11:57 am - IP Logged

                            I am under the impression at least here in Indiana you can claim in a trust and the trustee can appear at the press conference to collect the big check.  However, the lottery still has to know your identity and will process the claim in the normal channels.  So I don't think you can hid your child support or judgements, etc.  This is just my opinion and I could be wrong.

                            "This is just my opinion and I could be wrong."

                            When the NY lawyer tried to claim that jackpot winning Hot Lotto ticket on behalf of a trust, the Iowa Lottery wanted the name of the person purchasing the ticket before they write the check. We now know why that trust was formed, but the rule to know who purchased the ticket is probably for some the reasons you listed. Somebody in KY matched 5 + 0 in PB and the lottery said they would give the store location after verifying where the ticket was sold. Knowing the store won't prevent the winner from claiming via trust, but somebody in store knows who bought the ticket.

                            Most people play lottery games for a chance to make their lives less complicated, but when security people, lawyers, CPAs, estate, and financial planners become necessities, their lives become much more complicated.

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                              Posted: February 24, 2015, 8:50 am - IP Logged

                              I read that article shortly after it was published.  Well, then that blows the water out of every argument that Texas doesn't allow for anonymous claiming then, huh?   Not sure on the particulars, but I believe  there is another lottery winner that's done the same here.  That's what you should do if you ever win the lottery in Texas.  Me?  I'm saving my money and investing instead in a little sidearm security if I feel threatened.  I'll also get a new phone number and will move, not simply because I'll be worried about my safety, but because I'll be rich and want to do those things anyway.

                              As I've proved several times, claiming anonymously doesn't guarantee someone's safety since it's nearly always been a friend or family member killing the lottery winner.  You can't keep winning the lottery a secret from friends and family, at least not for very long. The chance of a secret being kept is inversely proportional to the square of the number of people who know it.

                              I'm still waiting on you for that list of lottery winners killed by strangers.  Oh wait, I already posted it.   I guess you didn't read it since it wasn't in the Houston Chronicle.  (although I write much better than those progressive hacks and my facts are researched)

                              "claiming anonymously doesn't guarantee someone's safety"

                              True,  however that shouldn't discourage the idea of wanting to claim anonymously.

                              Trump 2016!