Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 9, 2016, 10:18 am
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Are you ready for the attention?

Topic closed. 184 replies. Last post 11 months ago by AlecWest.

Page 8 of 13
4.77
PrintE-mailLink

Do you REALLY want to win a billion dollar jackpot?

Yes [ 79 ]  [70.54%]
No [ 14 ]  [12.50%]
Would rather share such a huge prize. [ 19 ]  [16.96%]
Total Valid Votes [ 112 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 4 ]  
travelintrucker's avatar - morph
Greenville, SC
United States
Member #169870
November 4, 2015
374 Posts
Offline
Posted: January 8, 2016, 9:38 pm - IP Logged

I came across your website awhile back. It's interesting. The problem with changing your name is, it gets published in the news paper. I try to buy my tickets in SC where I can remain anonymous. However, if there's a sole winner from any anonymous state, or state that allows trusts, LLCs, I don't think they'll allow it. There will to big of a public out cry and politicians may even get involved. If there's a sole winner for this big jackpot, it'd be best to just take one for the team. I'd use a lot of you info, though.

May the balls bounce in your favor!

    Avatar
    New Member
    KCMO
    United States
    Member #163681
    February 7, 2015
    56 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: January 8, 2016, 9:42 pm - IP Logged

    I came across your website awhile back. It's interesting. The problem with changing your name is, it gets published in the news paper. I try to buy my tickets in SC where I can remain anonymous. However, if there's a sole winner from any anonymous state, or state that allows trusts, LLCs, I don't think they'll allow it. There will to big of a public out cry and politicians may even get involved. If there's a sole winner for this big jackpot, it'd be best to just take one for the team. I'd use a lot of you info, though.

    Yeah the money will be great but the attention will be the worst part. Every person who has any story/connection to you will be asking for a handout. 

    I wish you could just claim it via a LLC you setup and claim it in person by an attorney-representative...remaining anonymous would be great

      AlecWest's avatar - alec
      Vader, Washington
      United States
      Member #29697
      January 5, 2006
      108 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: January 8, 2016, 9:49 pm - IP Logged

      I came across your website awhile back. It's interesting. The problem with changing your name is, it gets published in the news paper. I try to buy my tickets in SC where I can remain anonymous. However, if there's a sole winner from any anonymous state, or state that allows trusts, LLCs, I don't think they'll allow it. There will to big of a public out cry and politicians may even get involved. If there's a sole winner for this big jackpot, it'd be best to just take one for the team. I'd use a lot of you info, though.

      Yup, name change requests get published in a newspaper.  But remember, they're published approximately 90 days BEFORE the name change order is approved.  Until it is approved, no one would know "why" a person is changing their name - unless the winner "bragged" to people about it.  Until a winner redeems a ticket, and assuming the winner keeps their mouth shut about winning, a person changing their name is a "nobody" insofar as the media is concerned.  Also keep in mind that legal name change requests are published only in the "legal" section of the newspaper's classified ads section.  And the only people I know who check that section are private/public law enforcement people and collection agencies - trying to catch "skippers" trying to elude them.  I don't know any of my friends & neighbors who read that section of the newspaper classifieds.  And even if they did read it and suspect it was me, would it still be in their memory 90 days later when I (the winner) came forward using that new name?  Doubtful.

      Besides, as soon as I got the money, I'd leave on a month-long road-trip (grin) - making it problematic for anyone, media and otherwise, to find me.  Two axioms apply to the media - (1) old news is bad news, and (2) time is money.  If a media hound could not locate me for a month, his/her boss would tell the media hound to stop wasting their time and move on to a newer story.

        mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
        Texas Panhandle
        United States
        Member #136843
        December 20, 2012
        1280 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: January 8, 2016, 9:58 pm - IP Logged

        Make it clear at the press conference that while you will not pay ransom, you are perfectly willing to spend every cent of your winnings to hunt down the kidnappers.

        "Millions for defense, but not one cent for tribute."

        I like that quote - as valid today as it was a couple of centuries ago.

        Kidnapping would be the very least of my worries;  I have no children and my sisters and their children have different last names than mine.  Someone brought up that the lottery winner could be kidnapped but that would be a little short-sighted on the kidnapper's part. "Would you take a check, Mr. Kidnapper?  I don't have a million on me at the moment."  Mine is a unique case, I'll admit and if I DID have kids, I'd certainly make sure they were as secure as possible. 

        Besides that, kidnappings for ransom are very rare in the U.S....unless you live on the Mexican border.  On top of all that, about half of kidnapping victims are killed, anyway so it's basically a flip of the coin if your payment is going to bring them back home.  As far as I know, the only lottery-related kidnapping was the Graeme Thorne kidnapping, over half a century ago and half a world away.

          AlecWest's avatar - alec
          Vader, Washington
          United States
          Member #29697
          January 5, 2006
          108 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: January 8, 2016, 11:15 pm - IP Logged

          I like that quote - as valid today as it was a couple of centuries ago.

          Kidnapping would be the very least of my worries;  I have no children and my sisters and their children have different last names than mine.  Someone brought up that the lottery winner could be kidnapped but that would be a little short-sighted on the kidnapper's part. "Would you take a check, Mr. Kidnapper?  I don't have a million on me at the moment."  Mine is a unique case, I'll admit and if I DID have kids, I'd certainly make sure they were as secure as possible. 

          Besides that, kidnappings for ransom are very rare in the U.S....unless you live on the Mexican border.  On top of all that, about half of kidnapping victims are killed, anyway so it's basically a flip of the coin if your payment is going to bring them back home.  As far as I know, the only lottery-related kidnapping was the Graeme Thorne kidnapping, over half a century ago and half a world away.

          Could a billion dollar jackpot possibly alter the chances of being kidnapped?

            mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
            Texas Panhandle
            United States
            Member #136843
            December 20, 2012
            1280 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: January 8, 2016, 11:22 pm - IP Logged

            Could a billion dollar jackpot possibly alter the chances of being kidnapped?

            Sorry, my crystal ball is broken.


            A people that elect corrupt politicians, impostors, thieves and traitors are not victims...but accomplices.
             - George Orwell

              AlecWest's avatar - alec
              Vader, Washington
              United States
              Member #29697
              January 5, 2006
              108 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: January 8, 2016, 11:25 pm - IP Logged

              Sorry, my crystal ball is broken.

              Exactly.  It no longer exists in the "it'll never happen" realm.  It exists in the "maybe" realm.

                Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                United States
                Member #142499
                May 13, 2013
                1186 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: January 9, 2016, 12:17 am - IP Logged

                I like that quote - as valid today as it was a couple of centuries ago.

                Kidnapping would be the very least of my worries;  I have no children and my sisters and their children have different last names than mine.  Someone brought up that the lottery winner could be kidnapped but that would be a little short-sighted on the kidnapper's part. "Would you take a check, Mr. Kidnapper?  I don't have a million on me at the moment."  Mine is a unique case, I'll admit and if I DID have kids, I'd certainly make sure they were as secure as possible. 

                Besides that, kidnappings for ransom are very rare in the U.S....unless you live on the Mexican border.  On top of all that, about half of kidnapping victims are killed, anyway so it's basically a flip of the coin if your payment is going to bring them back home.  As far as I know, the only lottery-related kidnapping was the Graeme Thorne kidnapping, over half a century ago and half a world away.

                The problem with your premise, Mike, is that you're assuming it'll be smart people kidnapping you. Lot of really stupid criminals out there. Remember the Exxon exec who got kidnapped from his driveway? His kidnappers were too stupid to realize that when you lock someone up in a box for 3 days, it's necessary to drill holes in it so the victim can breathe. 

                The truth is that kidnappings do in fact happen all the time in the US, but for some reason the media prefers to use words like abducted, lured or missing. The reason schools won't let a kid go home with anyone but who they have on the release form is because so many kids have been "kidnapped". But they don't use that word.

                If you work in a hospital, they'll have a 'Code Pink' for a "missing infant" or "attempted abduction". That's happened enough for us to do mandatory drills every year and yet not a single drill for a Code Black.

                There have been a slew of home invasions in the wealthiest zip code in the state of GA for the last year. In one case, they held the woman of the house hostage while the other "abductor" took her boyfriend to an ATM to withdraw funds. Only then were they let go.

                These wealthy people are essentially being held against their will until they pay for their own release. Sounds like kidnapping to me.

                Don't think for a second that taking someone for money or pleasure is a rarity in America. A kidnapping by any other name, is still a kidnapping.

                I might wake up early and go running.  I might also wake up and win the lottery.

                The odds are about the same.

                  AlecWest's avatar - alec
                  Vader, Washington
                  United States
                  Member #29697
                  January 5, 2006
                  108 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: January 9, 2016, 11:01 pm - IP Logged

                  Teddi --- Yup.  Almost every kidnapping involves an attempt to acquire money.  In 2005, $20,000,000 lottery winner Jeffrey Dampier was kidnapped and murdered by his sister-in-law & her boyfriend.  In 1989, the brother of $16,200,000 lottery winner, William Post, hired a hit-man to kill him ... in hopes that he'd inherit part of his brother's jackpot.  Post didn't get killed but probably wished he had been killed.  He's an example of a universally stupid winner who lived large and flaunted his wealth.  He finally died of old age - broke and living on food stamps and public assistance.

                  Thing is, in Dampier's case, his lottery win took place 9 years earlier in 1996.  Talk about a "delayed-reaction" crime.  Anyone who wins a big jackpot, especially those who flaunt it in public, can't stop worrying about criminals just because a little time has passed by.

                    Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                    United States
                    Member #142499
                    May 13, 2013
                    1186 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: January 10, 2016, 2:31 am - IP Logged

                    Teddi --- Yup.  Almost every kidnapping involves an attempt to acquire money.  In 2005, $20,000,000 lottery winner Jeffrey Dampier was kidnapped and murdered by his sister-in-law & her boyfriend.  In 1989, the brother of $16,200,000 lottery winner, William Post, hired a hit-man to kill him ... in hopes that he'd inherit part of his brother's jackpot.  Post didn't get killed but probably wished he had been killed.  He's an example of a universally stupid winner who lived large and flaunted his wealth.  He finally died of old age - broke and living on food stamps and public assistance.

                    Thing is, in Dampier's case, his lottery win took place 9 years earlier in 1996.  Talk about a "delayed-reaction" crime.  Anyone who wins a big jackpot, especially those who flaunt it in public, can't stop worrying about criminals just because a little time has passed by.

                    Bud Post actually had multiple attempts on  his life. The hitman who got cold feet seems to be the only one that made news. Bud had one of his car messed with in the hopes that he'd be killed in an accident, and he also was given cyanide.

                    The delay in Dampier's case was simply because he never advertised the fact that he was a lottery winner and I'm sure that had his sister-in-law  not moved in with him, he'd be alive today.

                    I agree Dampier's situation should be counted as a kidnapping, because he was taken from point A to point B against his will, but I don't count it as directly related to the lottery. That situation would have played out the same way had he gotten that money from profitable business ventures.

                    I might wake up early and go running.  I might also wake up and win the lottery.

                    The odds are about the same.

                      lakerben's avatar - spherewall
                      New Mexico
                      United States
                      Member #86099
                      January 29, 2010
                      11119 Posts
                      Offline
                      Posted: January 10, 2016, 2:36 am - IP Logged

                      I imagine 4 tickets will hit on the next draw. It will be divided up.  No drama.  I'll be spending like no tomorrow.

                      How about them cowboys!

                       

                       

                      US Flag

                        OldSchoolPa's avatar - Lottery-057.jpg
                        Gurnee, Illinois
                        United States
                        Member #49731
                        February 12, 2007
                        917 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: January 10, 2016, 5:16 am - IP Logged

                        Humor this. We finally achieve the "billion dollar Powerball jackpot." Do you really want to be the sole winner? Are you ready for the media attention? You're pretty much going to be forced in to the 'A' list club. I believe if there's only one winner, there's going to be a lot of social pressure to make the winner known to the public. Anonymity will go out the window even in an anonymous state. In fact, it'd probably better to willingly come forward to protect other jackpot winner's anonymity. There hasn't been a lot of media attention on Gloria Mackenzie since her big win. However, I think things will be different if you're an overnight billionaire. Think Edtv. I personally think I could handle it. The first thing I'd do is hire about 5 security guards. What are your thoughts on the subject?

                        When I win on Wednesday, I will show up wearing hilarious disguise. I will claim it in a trust. However, I won't be a true billionaire since the $1.3 billion is a 26 year annuity and even if the cash value hits $1 billion, Uncle Sam Obama will take 35 percent cut for doing nothing for me.

                        Get MONEY!!! Winning a JACKPOT lottery is all the HOPE and CHANGE I desire!!!  NOW give me MONEY!US Flag

                        The guy who won the presidency in 2008 really won the lottery...he is now millions richer, travels in first class style, and even has a staff that would be the envy of the richest Powerball winner (she has a staff of 2). Every night he goes to sleep, he probably plays the close of Dave Chappelle's Show: I'm rich beyatch!

                          MaximumMillions's avatar - Lottery-013.jpg

                          Germany
                          Member #164603
                          March 8, 2015
                          613 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: January 10, 2016, 7:10 am - IP Logged

                          Yup, name change requests get published in a newspaper.  But remember, they're published approximately 90 days BEFORE the name change order is approved.  Until it is approved, no one would know "why" a person is changing their name - unless the winner "bragged" to people about it.  Until a winner redeems a ticket, and assuming the winner keeps their mouth shut about winning, a person changing their name is a "nobody" insofar as the media is concerned.  Also keep in mind that legal name change requests are published only in the "legal" section of the newspaper's classified ads section.  And the only people I know who check that section are private/public law enforcement people and collection agencies - trying to catch "skippers" trying to elude them.  I don't know any of my friends & neighbors who read that section of the newspaper classifieds.  And even if they did read it and suspect it was me, would it still be in their memory 90 days later when I (the winner) came forward using that new name?  Doubtful.

                          Besides, as soon as I got the money, I'd leave on a month-long road-trip (grin) - making it problematic for anyone, media and otherwise, to find me.  Two axioms apply to the media - (1) old news is bad news, and (2) time is money.  If a media hound could not locate me for a month, his/her boss would tell the media hound to stop wasting their time and move on to a newer story.

                          What I get from this is it would be smartest to file your name change ~80 days before your planned win claim date so shortly after claiming your name is changed and the newspaper ad has run out. How long do the ads have to appear? Once a week?

                            AlecWest's avatar - alec
                            Vader, Washington
                            United States
                            Member #29697
                            January 5, 2006
                            108 Posts
                            Offline
                            Posted: January 10, 2016, 7:41 am - IP Logged

                            When I win on Wednesday, I will show up wearing hilarious disguise. I will claim it in a trust. However, I won't be a true billionaire since the $1.3 billion is a 26 year annuity and even if the cash value hits $1 billion, Uncle Sam Obama will take 35 percent cut for doing nothing for me.

                            Hehehe.  Many years ago when the Washington State Lottery Commission first offered its state lotto game, some guy won a modest jackpot.  Apparently worried about media attention, he showed up at the regional lottery office in Vancouver, Washington (just across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon) wearing a gorilla costume (grin).  And while he was standing in front of the customer service window redeeming his ticket, one of the media people reached out and tried to remove his gorilla mask.  The guy spun around, flailed his fists at the jerk, and yelled "Back off!"  I didn't know the guy.  But the jerk was an acquaintance of mine who worked as a cameraman for Channel 12, KPTV, in Portland.  This was broadcast live, as it happened, on KPTV.  I just about fell off my couch, laughing.

                            As I understand it, if a winner took an annuity on the Powerball, it would be 30 payments spread out over 29 years.  And if you are a single person, the annuity amount on a $1,300,000,000 jackpot would be so high that, tax-wise, the annuity payment or the lump-sum would suffer the same tax bite - 39.6% of all money over $415,050 plus $120,529.75.  Of course, if the winner is unlucky enough live in an area with state, county, city, or MSD (metropolitan service district) income taxes, the winner would take home even less.

                            The one good thing about the annuity is that yearly payments are increased by 4% per year to account for the cost of living.

                            I've been thinking a lot about this and, if I was the sole winner, I think I'd probably take the annuity.  Then I'd set up an irrevocable living trust so that if I died prior to full payout (likely, since I'd be 95 if I didn't die), the money would go to designated charities - and bar relatives from fighting over it (grin).

                              AlecWest's avatar - alec
                              Vader, Washington
                              United States
                              Member #29697
                              January 5, 2006
                              108 Posts
                              Offline
                              Posted: January 10, 2016, 7:56 am - IP Logged

                              What I get from this is it would be smartest to file your name change ~80 days before your planned win claim date so shortly after claiming your name is changed and the newspaper ad has run out. How long do the ads have to appear? Once a week?

                              When I did my own name change back in 1992 (in Washington state), the petition notice only showed up in the Columbian newspaper for one week and then disappeared.  And when the name change was approved, there was no notice at all.  But that makes sense.  The reason the petition notice is published - and why it takes about 90 days to approve a name change - is because the court wants to give the public (by reading about it in the legal section of the classifieds) a chance to "challenge" the petition for name change.  If I was running from the law or running from a bad debt (which I wasn't), I'm certain it would have been challenged.  The legal notice in newspapers is kind of like the last words in a marriage ceremony - "...and if anyone knows a reason why these two should not be married, let him speak now or forever hold his peace."  After giving that notice (for however long it might be published), the court has "covered its hiney" (grin) and is free to approve the name change unless they receive a challenge in a reasonable amount of time following publication.

                                 
                                Page 8 of 13